Weber's Theoretical Rationality

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Weber authenticated rationality pertaining to values and believed that who are hopeful of the capitalist economy, liberal politics and rationality to rescue human kinds are wrong and he sought an alternative way. He put emphasis on religious faith & morality and believed: “If values become restored, human life will survive from this condition. However, there is an important question in here: “What are these values?”. It seems the values require theoretical bases and epistemology. In other words, theoretical rationality is a means to demonstrate values and goals. Theoretical rationality tries to govern nature intentionally and supernatural issues are defined through abstract notions. Pointing to this kind of rationality, Weber reminded us witches, …show more content…
Conceptual interpretations of human and the world which will legitimate human beings’ recognition of world will provide meanings for his own goals and objectives. This will demonstrate moral systems (Parsons, 1379). Firstly rationalization means presenting human beings with an independent view toward the material and interpreting natural phenomena and events without referring to anything outside of nature. Secondly, humankind restricts his/her own knowledge and recognition of world to this earthly and material world. When the world cut its cord from its origin and destination, the only priority with is prominent is describing the present situation of the world and things around. Beginning of rationalism of thoughts must track its origin in Greek philosophy and hidden theoretical rationalism found there. Because by presenting a rationalistic interpretation of the world, religious and heavenly interpretations gradually faded. This kind of novel thought soared by the advent of implemental rationalism and novel scientific approach. Therefore, the rationalism of thoughts in the form of scientific, academic and rational perspective toward the natural and humanistic world and putting aside anything else will be fulfilled. To sum up, the rationalism of thoughts is a gradual experimental, implemental and rational substitution for religious and magical knowledge …show more content…
The objective of this dimension of rationalization is society’s intellectual system and cognitive goal; a system that directs social and individual behaviors and brings answers to its fundamental issues and existential dilemmas. Weber does not consider secularism as the only contributor to the rationalization of the intellectual order of the society and thinks of the religion as a collaborator in this process. Weber believes that the main objective of prophets and religious saviors were to rationalize the whole way of life. Salvation religions are those that seek deliverance from agony. The life will grow to be much more rationalized as the essence of this agony is subtilized and becomes more fundamental; since in this condition, bringing up a permanent haven against this agony is a prominent matter (Weber

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