First Lady Michelle Obama Analysis

Great Essays
A Theoretical Prespective of First Lady Michelle Obama While many men and women alike, perceive the simple participation of females in political aspects of life to be achieving equality, this is simply not the case. Accounting for factors addressing the relation between portrayal and an individual 's behaviour also shape one 's political agency or freedom. This, when considering historical context, is especially true in regards to women in politics. Michelle Obama is not only seen as the First Lady of the United States of America, but also as a mother, activist, and popular icon. Her “unpaid and often unwanted role” (Henneberger, 2008, p. 8) as the First Lady are particularly defined and characterized by her race and gender. Within this essay …show more content…
Specifically, her involvement in charity work would be something that Mill would critique as demonstrating moral sensibility, something that is associated with being weak. Mill expresses that women are more concerned with private virtues, such as family and charity. Along with being the first lady, Michelle Obama is recognized as an activist, she is behind many successful causes, she is particular known for her public policy initiative Lets Move! (Grey, 2016, p. 568) However, even in the case of her campaign, media was quick to criticize, with one reporter entailing that she isn’t practicing what Lets Move! promotes.(Grey, 2016, p. 564) In her article Contesting the Fit Citizen: Michelle Obama and the Body Politics of The Biggest Loser, Grey recognizes that previous First Ladies have gravitated towards causes that target vulnerable members of the population, such as soldiers and those affected by mental health. Campaigns that are associated with what can be described as nurturance or domesticity. (Grey, 2016, p. 565) Political scientists have defined stereotypically feminine traits as relating to “warmth, kindness, understanding, expressiveness, gentleness, passiveness, compassion, trustworthiness, morality, and emotion…” and masculine traits as “… strength, toughness, competency, rationality, stability, decisiveness, directness, assertiveness, …show more content…
Michelle Obama’s experience with the press in her initial step into politics caused a great amount of hostility that influenced her to change the way she was presenting herself. What began as criticism of being masculine, of Arab descent and too African-American transformed into a rebranding demonstrating nationality, mothering and interest in fashion. Michelle Obama acts as an example of the standards to which women are held within both the public and private spheres of life, her experiences demonstrate that nonconformity are detrimental and punished. Further, the effect of race on ones gender identity are also called into question; while every individual possesses subconscious biases the role of media in perpetuating these biases further marginalize women of

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Hillary Clinton: Feminism

    • 1716 Words
    • 7 Pages

    These rights include the right to hold public office, equal right to marriage, right from rape and any sexual harassment, and domestic violence. In her campaign trail when she announced that her husband would join hand to support her in her ambition clearly shows that she is anti-feminist since it is not a good portrait in the public domain since Bill Clinton has faced a lot of counter-accusation of sexual harassment of the females and this brings queries about her moves and the treatment of the women who were involved in these cases of sexual assaults while on her side she claims to be a feminist, claiming that the involved persons in the sexual assault have the right to be heard and…

    • 1716 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sexism In Politics

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages

    There is a strong contradiction in these results because of the underlying misogyny in American politics. People are proud to say that women have the right qualities to president, but are resistant to say that they will make a better president than men. Female presidential candidates must learn to fight this…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    I argue that the Yellow Wall Paper by Charlotte Gilman, and Angels in America by Tony Kushner, both confront the sexual politics of the husband-wife relationships. As much as we may want to believe that inequality is a thing in the past, inequality is very much still present. The stories both symbolize unhappy wives, who not only are in agony, but both women are in torment and feel oppressed in their relationships. According to the novels, women have always come second to the male population. The stories challenge us to contemplate on the oppression and exploitation of women.…

    • 1937 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Utricia Jones Prof. Lautrec ENG 103 Research Paper February 11, 2015 Modern society has given a way for stride regarding gender and the way women are viewed. Unfortunately, there are some stereotypes that prevail for instance, the way women are looked at, and portrayed in the political media such as news and television. These view-points can be found in our everyday lives. The political media uses the existing advantage of American society which really proves that the male gender is more dominant over females. Women are not getting into office because men get all the attention and votes.…

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Political Intersectionality: Crenshaw highlights conflicting political agendas, the black woman’s experience of racism from the black man and the sexist experience from a white women. She argues domestic violence shelters marginalized women of color by creating policies and strategies to disregard their intersectional needs. (1262). Crenshaw addresses the race code and cultural imagery of the black female body. Representational Intersectionality: Crenshaw explores the problem of how images of women of color ignore their intersectionality interests (1283).…

    • 1388 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “I do not wish them [women] to have power over men; but over themselves.” (Mary Wollstonecraft) Women’s rights remain as some of the biggest issues talked about in society today. Women in this generation sense a need of representative who obtains their rights in mind, and willing to fight for them. For this reason, the article “Dreams of My Mother "by Anna March attempts to convince readers regarding the legitimacy of Mrs. Clinton's candidacy by using issues, pathological appeals and characterization pulling readers in to see her side of the argument. To start with, in “Dreams of My Mother” by Anna March she centers the article on issues. She employs the core of humanity approach, by stating that “It feels important what I do for women…

    • 1042 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This passage defines a unique area of intersectionality. She states that, “The concept of political intersectionality highlights the fact that women of color are situated within at least two subordinated groups that frequently pursue conflicting political agendas.” Therefore, the implications of this distinct group of women of color creates a strong argument that women of color face not only racism but also sexism. This is unlike any white woman or black man because they have now created a new group of…

    • 883 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Her biggest reasons for wanting a women president is because there is not enough women within America’s government history. She feels that young girls will see this trend of men in government and become discouraged in striving for a position in government. She also notes all of the other countries that have welcomed women as a part of their government and she thinks that America should follow suit. It is for these reasons that people see Clinton’s gender as an opportunity for a better country rather than Clinton’s stand on public and political issues. However, America seems closely split down the middle between people who want change and people who do not.…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Her story is not a love story, yet it was what history and America remembers it as. Women’s history is not meant to be glossed over as a subheading in a textbook chapter. Women have always maintained a prevalent and important role in the history of the American continent, both before and after the Europeans laid claim on it. Yet their contributions and strength are often overlooked to that of their male counterparts, as they are seen as a higher influence on history. But as Linda Kerber points out, “One of the most effective ways in which the dominant groups maintain their power is by depriving the people they dominate of the knowledge of their own history.” The study of women’s history is integral to our…

    • 1291 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Second Wave Feminism

    • 1979 Words
    • 8 Pages

    While the Redstocking 's achieved much in starting a conversation against the objectification of women, they also brought about one of the feminist movements greatest ongoing challenge, which is the stereotype of feminists as overly radical, ugly, and man hating individuals. The early stages of the second wave of feminism is also heavily criticized for its, however unintentional, exclusionary nature towards anyone other than upper middle class white women. Orgainizations like the National Organization for Women (NOW), where a step forward for organized advocacy of women 's rights, they were excluded for their exclusion of the working class, and in particular, black women. (Pacific University). This issue brought about the formation of seperate black feminist organizations, such as…

    • 1979 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays