Themes In The Wizard Of Oz

1832 Words 8 Pages
For the last one hundred years, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum, and its 1939 motion picture counterpart, The Wizard of Oz, directed by Victor Fleming, Mervyn LeRoy, and George Cukor, have had tremendous effects on the culture of the United States of America. Fulfilling dreams as a child and, on a grander scale, promoting Populism, are some of the most noted influential concepts put forth by both adaptions. Whether it was the adventurous story of how a young girl returned to her family or the symbolism of political satire, this novel and film sneaked its way into the hearts of many around the world. In the beginning of his life, L. Frank Baum faced many challenges, such as being sent to military school and eventually not graduating, …show more content…
Throughout both installments, the yellow brick road is a common theme that ironically represent the gold, which the Populists believe should be coined more. Another reference to gold is the magic golden cap that the Wicked Witch of the West possessed. This cap allows the owner to call the Flying Monkeys to carry out three of their commands, which is symbolic for those who have obtained gold to have a higher social ranking and the ability to fulfill more of their wishes. The Emerald City, for obvious reasons, quite possibly stand for the wealth of the government. Dorothy’s magical silver slippers, changed to ruby to showcase the advancement of Technicolor films, were also a prime example of monetary issues represented because of the people’s belief in free coinage of the fine metal …show more content…
However in 1867, the author did comment on the purpose of his writing saying, “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was written solely to please the children of today” (Sutton). In correspondence with Baum’s quote, the writing has lived to serve its purpose, especially with the aid of the movie, and has also added a little more than just amusement. Since the release of both, the book and film, children, and their families, have been provided with entertainment that has positive influences from the lessons the Wizard gives to each character in regards to their wishes – brains, a heart, courage, a way home – even after they have proven him to be a “humbug” (Baum 208) Many writers such as Houlberg and Sutton, have written on the lessons given trough the novel and

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