Themes In The Harlem Renaissance

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The emergence of the Harlem Renaissance in 1938 was some form of the celebration of the African American culture with the main focus on creative arts. This happened after both the Americans and Africans had experienced bondage of slavery, which unified them. They had moved from the rural south in search for a better life to the urban North because there were several industrial factories in the south and cheap labour was available. The Northerners were not pleased with the arrival of the Southerners as they claimed that they took most of their jobs, rendering the northerners jobless. The black culture took its pride during this period, and this is clearly reflected in the world today. This forced the African Americans to settle for cheap areas in the urban slums, which included Harlem, which was the largest. Alain Locke role in Harlem Renaissance was nurturing and identifying work by the African Americans especially in visual arts and literature (Brewer 27). This essay highlights the impact of the Harlem Renaissance and how many other writers and
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A lot of art literature is being created by today’s artists such as Duke Ellington, who now express their human civil right. The whites in the modern society have not fully accepted the fact that the African Americans have equal rights and have kept them from gaining these rights (Brewer 27). The literary themes that emerged after the Harlem Renaissance were based on the need to embrace racial pride and the settlement of the Africans in the urban north. This has led to the African Americans expressing their emotions through art that helps them campaign for their freedom. When it comes to music, the African American artists realize songs that every person can listen to regardless of their age unlike before when the audience was

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