Huckleberry Finn Romanticism

2289 Words 10 Pages
Throughout history we have seen many good books but none as good as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This book shines in front of others because of how Twain ties taboo, sensitive subjects, or, as Ernest Hemingway would say the use of “All American Literature” into this novel on realism written in the late 1800’s. In Huck Finn, Twain has no problem writing about what interest him that he feels the need to write about. He shows the flaws in human society by writing about child abuse, ignorance and racism, hypocrisy in the south, and the friendship of a white boy and a black man which for the most part have all never been really done befor. In the novel the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, Twain uses “All American literature,” …show more content…
Going back to the gang that Tom created, he preaches to all the boys that they “must do everything just as the books did, “(Twain 9). This shows satire by exposing the flaw of romantics and how they believed that whatever was written in the books must be true even though that doesn 't mean it is right or wrong. This is a very interesting point in the story, Twain is showing that people of that time believed that the only things written in books were the truth, and only the truth and this still happens to this day. A common theme is shared by the satire in all the books we have read so far, the flaws of human society hundreds of years ago still havent havent changed and still occur today(like the girls blaming others to stay out of trouble and protect themselves in The Crucible and many more). Just because the book says to do something the boys trust Tom and believe he is right and show ignorance because they don 't even question if their all making the right decisions. As the story progresses, Huck seems to mature and Tom is still lacking. Tom tends to make up outlandish schemes in order to save Jim towards the end of the book. He puts,”snakes and rats,” in Jims shed for,”a realistic taming of wild animals by the hero,” he,”bakes a pie with rope in it,” and he,”writes letters describing the jailbreak,” to Sally Phelps in order to,”make Jims escape more of an adventure,” when he couldve …show more content…
When he gets a tour of the house, he finds a shrine littered with poetry and art from their daughter Emmeline. Twain uses this part of the story to poke fun at melodramatic art and poetry. The first painting that huck looks at, titled:”shall i never see three more Alas,” is ridiculed by Huck though he does not know it, he states that it is,”blacker than most paintings,” and the lady drawn in it has, “bulges like cabbages halfway down her arm,”(Twain 102). Twain uses Hucks comments to show his feelings towards the meloframatic art that she has drawn and uses satire to question why people frame or admire this art. One could argue that Twain is using this quote to show the cruelty of human society, that they are willing to make fun of something that a dead girl has made and cherished, just as Huck is doing her. This is an ignorant move by Huck, paying no attention to the mind of the grieving family and making fun of the art she worked so hard on and the family cherished and loves so much. Next, Huck sees another painting titled: “I shall never hear thy sweet chirrup more Alas,” and begins rattling off insults. He says,”her hair {was} all combed up straight to the top of her head, like a chair-back,” and he also says,” it was all knotted,” (Twain 102). These remarks by Twain through Huck again show both the the cruelty in society and the over

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