Theme Of Pride In The Epic Of Gilgamesh

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In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh and Enkidu both endure tests that reflect their prideful nature and doubt in themselves. These conflicts reveal the tendency of human nature to give into the weaknesses of the human flesh. Being able to determine what is ultimately right from wrong can lead us to triumph or loss. Pride plays a large role in the downfall of many great people, two being Gilgamesh and Enkidu. After Enkidu enters the kingdom of Uruk, Gilgamesh does not think twice when Enkidu prevents him from entering the gate, causing them to brawl for a long time until finally, “Gilgamesh bent his knee to the ground and turned away from Enkidu. His fury suddenly left him, for he realized this presumptuous stranger must be the Enkidu of his …show more content…
After Gilgamesh and Enkidu become friends, Enkidu starts feeling worthless and weak after living in the city and consequently Gilgamesh believes he can heal his sadness by together killing the giant Humbaba, but this only increases Enkidu’s pessimistic behavior as he says, “...the very thought of fighting that monstrous giant fills my heart with horror!” (Rosenberg 180). Just because Enkidu has fear did not mean he wasn’t worthy or able of the challenge, it just meant he doubted himself and his abilities, but with Gilgamesh’s words of inspiration he slowly came to believe they might have a chance to defeat Humbaba. In life now, everyone has separate goals and some may seem too large to achieve at times, but this negative way of thinking is only the fault of the human brain because nothing is impossible. If people are confident and believe they can achieve anything, they can, even if they require the help of others. Furthermore, Gilgamesh and Enkidu feel emotions of fear, worry and doubt over their quest to kill Humbaba and before killing him Gilgamesh almost backs down out of pity for the giant, but fulfills his quest after

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