Theme Of Naturalism In Miss Julie

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In the play, Miss Julie, Strindberg has effectively incorporated the theory of naturalism; the theory of naturalism encompassed the idea that a person and their motivations are rooted from their environment and their ancestry. In the case of Miss Julie, the daughter of a Count, she was ultimately thought to have gained the upper hand by being born into a family of status. However, her position in society quickly deteriorates when her engagement is broken off and she copulates with Jean, the valet boy who works for her father, the Count. Jean and Miss Julie are the physical manifestations of the oppression caused by the class system in the 19th century. While Jean aspires to someday, “up, up aloft” become the owner of his own hotel in Italy, …show more content…
Throughout the play both, Jean and Miss Julie are witnessed to have been challenging the social class boundaries; whether it be drinking the burgundy or having an illicit affair with someone from a lower …show more content…
But worse these last few days, since her engagement.” Since the engagement is called off Miss Julie has displayed questionable behaviour, “You should have seen her… the way she danced. Completely wild.” Miss Julie has adapted her manic patrician propensity from her father and the primordial, empowered behaviour from her mother. “She is wild again tonight, Miss Julie. Wild.” By using the title “Miss” Julie immediately classifies her a as Jean’s civil superior. Yet the fact that she is his social superior it does not stop her from engaging in flirtatious behaviour, “flicking his face with the kerchief.” It is due to the specific stage directions that Strindberg wrote that allows the audience to witness Miss Julie’s inadequacy regarding her social superiority and the unsettling temptation she poses for Jean. The audience is placed at the same level as the actors in a more intimate surrounding, thus allowing the audience to see the little private touches and movements that happen. The attraction towards each other shows they cannot be bound by an artificial social stratification. Moreover they should have to be careful about who they feel themselves attracted, and in the case they do, they should not suffer an untimely death for doing so. Throughout the play Miss Julie constantly defies the rules of society, further enticing Jean. It is not only her actions that question her positon

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