Theme Of Monstrosity In Frankenstein

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The Frankenstein narrative highlights numerous aspects of human psychology; among these are themes of secrecy, monstrosity, and dangerous knowledge. The tendencies toward secrecy are illustrated through the lack of collaboration in the physical creation of the monster. Victor Frankenstein lived and worked mainly by himself. In creating the monster, he only used his own knowledge in combination with the occasional help of a lab assistant (“pull the lever”). The presence of secrecy in this narrative accentuates the mysterious and taboo idea that is resurrection of the dead. Additionally, themes of monstrosity are present, seeing that (the monster) Frankenstein is wholly rejected by society. On account of his unnatural origins and rough appearance, the Frankenstein monster is a social reject and therefore, he is perceived as a danger to the misinformed town in which he lives. Lastly, the idea that knowledge can be dangerous is apparent through the negative events that follow …show more content…
Victor Frankenstein’s scientific endeavor leads him to confidently mess with the rules of the natural world. Through toying with the natural balance of things Victor, as well as the inhabitants of his town, were faced with the danger and unpredictability embodied in the Frankenstein monster. The presence of the monster illustrates a lack of comfort and control previously experienced by the town’s inhabitants.

Although the stars of Frankenweenie are an innocent young boy and a cute dog, Burton utilizes typical horror conventions to elicit fear in the viewer. Seeing that the two main characters are charming, Burton compensates by using tactics like including a creepy soundtrack and using shadows to indicate impending danger/doom. This contrast between seemingly good characters and a creepy theme and plotline seems to depict a more lighthearted interpretation of the original Frankenstein

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