Theme Of Literary Devices In The Great Gatsby

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Literary Device Quote Explanation

Metaphor “My own house was an eyesore,” (Fitzgerald 5). When Nick Carraway, the narrator, is comparing his house to some of the houses in the neighborhood, including Jay Gatsby’s house, Fitzgerald, through Carraway, employs a metaphor by relating his house to an eyesore without the use of like or as. Through this quote, Fitzgerald illustrates Carraway’s intentions for traveling from the Middle West to New York, money and power. Carraway’s greed leads him to meet Gatsby, a man with the money and power he desires, which leads to problems, since he has to act as a messenger between Gatsby and Daisy, the woman Gatsby loves. Carraway chooses to do so, even though Daisy is married to another man, Tom Buchanan, which shows his loss of social and moral values. Eventually, by connecting Gatsby and Daisy, Carraway indirectly causes the death of Gatsby, who has become a friend to Carraway. Fitzgerald illustrates the theme that often greed leads to the loss of social and
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When Gatsby and Daisy are together at Carraway’s house, Fitzgerald, through Carraway, employs personification, by relating a heart to a ghost, to show Gatsby’s love for Daisy. Through this quote, Fitzgerald illustrates the effect of greed on Gatsby by showing how his love for Daisy lasted even after many years and even though she is married to Buchanan. This proves that Gatsby has lost his social and moral values, since “[n]o amount of fire or freshness can challenge” his love for Daisy, the fire or freshness being the time between when he last saw Daisy and the present and Daisy’s marriage to Buchanan. In the end, his “ghostly heart” indirectly led to his death and eternally separated him from Daisy and Daisy from him. Fitzgerald illustrates the theme that often greed leads to the loss of social and moral values, which can lead to disastrous

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