Theme Of Knowledge In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Mary Shelley's romance novel Frankenstein, she emphasizes the theme of knowledge in order to tell the story of the curious scientist, Victor Frankenstein. The novel focuses on his deep desire to create human life and therefore he has a need for new knowledge. The knowledge he gains drives him to create a murderous monster that constantly causes corruption. Although labeled as a hideous, wretched monster throughout the novel, the creature develops a sense of innocence. As the monster proves his self worth, Victor loses his and morphed into a monster himself. This was the result of his use of knowledge. Shelley uses Frankenstein’s actions to prove that too much knowledge can be dangerous and even fatal. Victor is responsible for the deaths …show more content…
As the novel begins, Victor explains his passion and desire for creating a human, which has never been done before. He feels he needs to create this monster to fulfill his duties to humanity. Victor states, "A new species would bless me as its creator and source” (55), signifying his original mindset about creating the monster. Shelley uses the words “bless” and “creator” to show how Frankenstein’s creation would treat him as a human god. Because Frankenstein was clouded by the knowledge he was gaining he didn’t realize how it could affect others. After the monster was created, Frankenstein receives a letter from his father saying that his younger brother, William, has been murdered. Victor then returns to Geneva and discovers that the monster has killed his brother. He sees the monster lurking near where Williams body was found and assumes this crime was done by it. Shelley takes us through this moment and describes Frankenstein's feelings of doubt. He expresses his sadness about how he “had turned loose into the world a depraved wretch, whose delight was in carnage and misery” (78). The authors use of “misery” and “carnage” convey that the monster’s actions affected him immensely and …show more content…
The death of William was truly caused by Frankenstein’s monster, but instead Justine was blamed because of tampered evidence. During the court case, she fights for her innocence and no one believes her. Frankenstein describes his thoughts about how it should have been him being accused of Williams murder. Frankenstein proposes that “a thousand times rather would I have confessed myself guilty of the crime ascribed to Justine” (83). The use of “a thousand times” proves how the guilt consumes him, but he never tells anyone that the monster was the true killer. This represents how Frankenstein’s creation of the monster lead to corruption. The knowledge he needed to make this monster caused this corruption and the false accusations that were placed on Justine. As a result of the trial, the views people have in Frankenstein’s society were exposed. Many people neglected to support Justine because of the evidence help against her, which turned out to be false. Frankenstein does not want to expose the truth about williams death because he is afraid of being “considered as the ravings of a madman” (83). He does not want to be labeled as a the treacherous “madman” that created a devilish monster. Justine was in this position because of Frankenstein’s desire to discover the undiscovered. Frankenstein's knowledge

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