Theme Of Isolation In Into The Wild

1369 Words 6 Pages
Isolation: The Struggle to Find One’s Self In Into The Wild, Jon Krakauer investigates a young man’s struggle between isolation and forgiveness. This book shows the compelling, incredible adventure of Chris Mccandless, who leaves his home, family and money to disconnect himself from society and live the life he has always wanted. A simple young man, McCandless has a burning desire to live a simplistic nomadic lifestyle and explore the United States. This is a characteristic his family, his father in particular does not agree with, causing confliction within their household. A victim of an abusive childhood, McCandless attributes his isolation to his unstable relationship with his family. While McCandless’s father sees no wrong in his harsh …show more content…
That is, their relationship, or Chris's rejection of it, is central in prompting Chris's angry behavior in the few years he had between graduating from college and dying in Alaska. Ultimately leading to the notion that his inability to forgive arises from what he perceives as his parents’ greed and materialism. Which, in turn affects his entire life, contributing to his decision to isolate himself. Krakauer’s dedication to the research of McCandless’s journey conveys it was his life to live and no one else’s. Nonetheless, Christopher McCandless’s brave quest portrays an amazing young man with many talents and a gift to live life the way he always dreamed of. Krakauer’s analysis on McCandless’s journey leaves readers conflicted as to whether he wishes to be isolated from society or if he is struggling with the inability to forgive due to his anger towards his …show more content…
Krakauer characterizes McCandless's constant traveling as his way of escaping human connections. He isolates himself physically and emotionally, hoping to find freedom and self-identity within. McCandless goes to extreme lengths to avoid being like his parents, omitting experiences from his past life he and his friends once enjoyed, oblivious to the fact that he is hurting his friends and family as a result. In one particular scene Krakauer writes, “The hitchhiker swung his pack into the bed of the Ford and introduced himself as Alex” (4). Introducing himself as “Alexander” allows for his hope in building a new identity to become realistic. What is notable in this change is his feelings for his family, which is portrayed by deciding to no longer go with the family name as he travels. Krakauer’s use of an authentic perception allows readers to perceive McCandless on a personal level. While sociable with the strangers he meets on the road, McCandless breaks off all contact with his family. In doing so, he omits experiences from his past life which is portrayed through the people he meets on his journey into the wild. Some relationships with the people he comes across are more significant than others, leaving a great impact on his journey. In a postcard to Ron Franz McCandless writes, “So many people live within

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