Genetic Engineering In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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Book Portion: Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World may seem far fetched from today's society, but the reality of various Huxley predictions is very real. Huxley satirizes the use of genetic engineering by showing how various aspects of it in the New World State have led to inequality in social castes, dysfunctions in intelligence, and unwanted predestination. There are four different castes in Huxley’s Brave New World, and all of them are very different. “The shorter the oxygen.”(14). This references the lower caste, The Epsilons. The Epsilons were given less oxygen when they were infants which led to a high number of dwarfs and eye monsters. “But in Epsilons,” said Mr. Foster very unjustly, “we don’t need human intelligence.” (15). Epsilons …show more content…
The main problem and issue with embryos is that when scientist work on, and in the process of modifying the embryo is exposed. With them being exposed that is when the diseases fall in place and start to attack the embryo. But on the other hand editing sperm, eggs, and embryos can cause inheritable diseases. It’s one thing to edit an adult’s immune cells. If anything goes, the effects won’t be passed on. It’s another matter entirely to edit sperm, eggs, or embryos (known as the “germline”) and create genetic changes that can be passed down from generation to generation. No longer talking about editing a single human. We’re talking about editing …show more content…
It argues that the US government should allow clinical trials on editing sperm, eggs, or embryos, but only under very hard conditions. It should be done only to try to prevent “serious diseases” where there’s conflict between the gene in question and the disease and only when there are no effecting alternatives. The panel also urges rigorous oversight and a “continue to look at both health and societal benefits and risks. The panel concedes that this recommendation is likely to prove contentious. most people will see the idea of editing viable sperm, eggs, or embryos morally wrong. Others will note that concepts like effecting alternatives and “serious disease” are left frustratingly vague. And still other researchers may find these guidelines so strict as to bar useful research. We’re still not clear how widespread embryo editing would become even if US. As the panel notes because there are still, major technical challenges to be addressed in developing this technology for safe and predictable to use in humans. The panel predicts that we aren’t likely to see much germline genome editing to prevent disease in our future to come.
While Huxley’s view of the future may have seem extremely distorted in the early 1930’s, some of his predictions are closer than we think. Inequality in social castes, dysfunctions in intelligence, and unwanted/unforeseen predestination have all become very real issues. Genetic engineering has had its role

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