Theme Of Forgiveness In The Tempest

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Shakespeare throughout his play The Tempest, he paints the picture of forgiveness. He shows it through the characters, Caliban and Prospero. Prospero has his reason for hating Caliban because he tried to rape Prospero’s daughter Miranda, but there is a great deal more to Caliban’s character than just his mistakes. Caliban represents someone who is treated poorly and we as readers see Caliban made a horrible mistake. Throughout the play, Shakespeare shows us that Caliban is someone who needs forgiveness and better treatment by the people around him especially by Prospero. Caliban needs improved treatment and forgiveness because it will make him think he is a more worthwhile person and show he is a human, not a monster. From the beginning …show more content…
The other characters around Caliban such as Miranda, Trinculo, and Stephano do not treat him the best either, but we see Caliban through a different light when he has interactions with them. Even though Caliban hurt Miranda, she obviously does not care for him, but she is nowhere near as hostile to him as Prospero is. Miranda says to Caliban, “Abhorred slave, Which print any goodness wilt not take, Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee.” (Act 1, Scene 2). It is interesting to see yet Miranda does not think Caliban has any good in him, but she feels bad for him, pitying him even though he tried to hurt her. That is important because it displays Miranda is a better person than her father. It also shows that Miranda pities Caliban for his …show more content…
Caliban is constantly in a sour mood throughout most of the play and he always seems to be grouchy. He consistently has a bad attitude when it comes to almost everything. Right when he enters the play for the first time, he is grumpily ranting, “As wicked dew as e’er my mother brushed With raven’s feather from unwholesome fen Drop on you both! A southwest blow on ye And blister you all o’er!” (Act 1, Scene 2). We right away see Caliban’s foul attitude right when he walks into the play. He defends himself once in awhile, but it seems to be half hearted at times and he is tired of being treated the way he is. In beginning of the play when Caliban is talking to Prospero and Miranda, he pathetically tries to defend himself by saying, “You taught me language, and my profit on’t Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you For learning me your language.” (Act 1, Scene 2). When Caliban shouts this as Prospero we see how much Caliban detests Prospero and how he doesn’t even what to use Prospero’s language. Caliban’s words portray him as a character with a terrible attitude that is weak when it comes to respecting his self-identity and tired of being treated poorly. When we look through his perspective we feel empathy for him and wish he had it better. We want him to be treated finer and not for everyone to have such hostility towards

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