Theme Of Foreshadowing In Of Mice And Men By John Steinbeck

1059 Words 5 Pages
“I’m going for my shotgun. I’ll kill the big son-of-a-bitch myself. I’ll shoot ‘im in the guts.”(Steinbeck 96). In the novel, Of Mice and Men, written by John Steinbeck, set in the 1930s, two men are determined to achieve a dream of owning their own land and farm. This dream lands them in Soledad in search of jobs as migrant workers. Both are determined to work and achieve that dream of owning their farm. John Steinbeck uses foreshadowing in Of Mice and Men to give the reader a sense of caution and awareness of the patterns that keep reoccurring in the novel. Steinbeck shows foreshadows in the beginning of the novel when George explains to Lennie what do when he gets in any trouble, revealing that he’ll get into a fuss later on. Secondly, George …show more content…
Steinbeck writes about the dog being shot to end it’s suffering leading to George’s suffering from all the trouble Lennie caused. “I oughtta of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t oughtta let no stranger shoot my dog.” (61). Candy didn’t shoot his dog and now he regrets his decision. “And George raised the gun and steadied it / close to the back of Lennie’s head / He pulled the trigger.” (106). Steinbeck foreshadows Candy’s saying when he told George about his regret of not shooting his dog. As George doesn’t want to regret like Candy, he takes matter into his own hands. “You hadda, George. I swear you hadda.” (107). This statement shows that Slim understands why George decided to shoot Lennie himself rather than having the mob killing …show more content…
“That was your Aunt Clara. An’ she stopped givin’ ‘em to ya. You always killed ‘em.”(9). Lennie was always given mice to pet, but every mice that he receives, ends up dying because of Lennie’s harsh stroking. “He was so scairt he couldn’t let go of that dress. And he’s so God damn strong, you know.” (41). This conflict in the novel is the start of the pattern that Lennie is going to cause trouble later on, but shows that he has no intentions to cause the trouble. “ … [Lennie] looked at a dead puppy that lay in front of him / he put out his huge hand and stroked it, stroked it clear from one end to the other.” (85). The dead mice foreshadowed Lennie’s extreme fascination with holding soft objects and as well as the mice, his abrasive pampering of the puppy has an outcome of a loss. “Lennie’s fingers closed and hung on [her hair] / he was in a panic.” (91). As Curley’s wife unknowingly invites Lennie to stroke her hair, little does she know that Lennie is easily fascinated by soft things. She yells at him to let go, this overwhelms Lennie into holding on and not knowing when to let go. This is similar to what happened in Weed. “ … he shook her; and her body flopped like a fish. And then she was still, for Lennie had broken her neck.” (91). To

Related Documents