Theme Of Foolishness In The Great Gatsby

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“Unfortunately, some of our greatest tribulations are the result of our own foolishness and weakness and occur because of our own carelessness or transgression.” This quote from James E. Faust, an American politician, expresses F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ambience in his book The Great Gatsby. This book, set in the mid 1920s in New York, focuses on the charming, yet mysterious, Jay Gatsby who tries to rekindle an old love with Daisy Buchanan. Gatsby throws extravagant parties in hopes of impressing Daisy and winning her over; spending much of his money in the process. Fitzgerald creates an elaborate upper class to sharpen the luxuries of that era.The characters of The Great Gatsby are blinded by their wealth and it causes them to act in a careless …show more content…
She is often associated with the color white, appearing to be pure in a world of cheats and liars; however, as the book goes on, more of Daisy is revealed and bit-by-bit she becomes less of an epitome for elegance. Daisy is fully aware of Tom’s affair, but she doesn’t care because he has money and power. “Please, Tom! I can’t stand this anymore.”(Fitzgerald 134). With this quote Daisy retracted from Jay minutes after telling Tom she never loved him and was leaving him for Gatsby. Daisy had been so eager to leave her husband, but once Tom had told her what Jay actually does and that he had not always been rich, she went back to Tom. After the domestic confrontation, Daisy drove Gatsby’s car back and ended up hitting and killing Myrtle with the car. Tom, not wanting Daisy to take the blame for the hit and run, convince Wilson, her husband, that it was Gatsby’s car. Wilson then tracks Gatsby down and shoots him in his pool. Tom and Daisy …show more content…
He goes off to fight in the war, and ends up with lots of money. Gatsby throws huge, extravagant parties that cost lots of money. “I think he half expects her to wander into one of his parties, some night,” went on Jordan,” (Fitzgerald 79). Gatsby throws these parties in hope that Daisy will hear about them and come to one. He hopes she’ll come and see how much money he has now. He spends a fortune on these lavish parties, that he doesn’t even mingle at, just for the teeny chance of seeing Daisy. Gatsby lives his entire life for Daisy. As the story progresses and more rumors begin to spread about his occupation, Jay doesn’t flinch, even when they get close to the truth. “Who is this Gatsby anyhow?” demanded Tom suddenly. “Some big bootlegger?” (Fitzgerald 107). By the end of the book we learn that Gatsby is actually a bootlegger, but he does not care that people are talking about it. Jay does not seem to care about the consequence of being found out because the only thing he has to live for is Daisy. Throughout the entire book Gatsby is consumed by the memory of Daisy and he makes careless decisions because of this

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