Theme Of Failure In Things Fall Apart

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The struggles and successes a parent has can leave a long lasting impact on the lives of their children. Children can either aspire to follow the same path as their parent or to be the complete opposite. In the novel, “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe, Okonkwo observes all the situations his father, Unoka, goes through and decides he wants to be nothing like his father. Throughout the third and fourth chapter of book, Okonkwo detests all the struggles his father experiences and ultimately ends up strongly disliking Unoka based on his struggles. When Okonkwo is in his teenage years, he does everything he can to be successful and prosperous due to the failures he has seen his father live. Okonkwo’s development has been strongly influenced …show more content…
In a meeting to discuss the traditional ancient feast that was coming up, Okonkwo behaves in an ill way towards a man who had shared a disagreement with him. During the meeting of the village’s clan, an old man, “was struck, as most people were, by Okonkwo’s brusqueness in dealing with less successful men” (Achebe 26). The reason behind this behavior of Okonkwo is that anything that resembles his father, he hates. The very thought of his father irks him and Okonkwo lashes out at those who fail to meet his standards. When Unoka died, he left the world without a title and without an inheritance to leave to his son. Due to these actions, Okonkwo had to start from scratch and work his way up to the top to become the man he is today. As a result, Okonkwo looks down upon a person who he thinks has not been a diligent worker. Because the man of the clan presented a contradiction towards him, Okonkwo calls the man a woman. He is reminded to be humble and apologizes, but he still believes his hard work makes him above the rest. In addition, Okonkwo treats his son, Nwoye, harshly because he believes he like is Unoka with his consistent struggles. At home, Okonkwo rules the household with a strong, iron fist. He does not let any emotion other than anger be revealed because of …show more content…
In the beginning of chapter three, Unoka visits The Oracle to ask why his harvest always fails. The answer he received only adds on to the hatred Unoka feels for his father. Unoka is told by the priestess that he is too slothful when it comes to his crops and farm which is why he never has a prosperous harvest. At this moment, Okonkwo truly realizes that he had to do something different with life. “With a father like Unoka.” Achebe explains, “Okonkwo did not have the start in life which many young men had,” which only motivates Okonkwo and. “in spite of these disadvantages, he had begun even in his father’s lifetime to lay the foundations of a prosperous future” (Achebe 18). The struggles Unoka faced has only encouraged and motivated Okonkwo to become a more determined man. Although the lifestyle Unoka lived did not stop Okonkwo from achieving wealth and becoming a strong human being, it did influence the decisions that led to his rise in the clan of the village. Without watching the numerous struggles his father encountered, Okonkwo would not have aspired to get the best harvest he could get. Furthermore, Okonkwo’s sedulous character can be seen when he creates a barn of his own which he creates throughout the connections he has made with a wealthy man from the village. At a young age, Okonkwo

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