Character Analysis Of Tom Robinson In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird

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In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM hereafter), Scout has learned many lessons in her journey from being a naive child to a mature person. But the most important lesson she learns is that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird. Throughout the novel, Scout encounters many characters that are symbolised as a mockingbird, whose innocence has been destroyed by evil. Such characters are Tom Robinson, who gets falsely accused in court, ‘Boo’ Arthur Radley, who was misjudged throughout the book, and lastly the children, who were forced to leave their childhood naivety behind and face the evil and harsh world.
Tom Robinson was the most evident mockingbird in this novel, getting accused of a crime that he never committed. He got sentenced to jail on the sole basis that he was black, in spite of Atticus’s efforts to prove him innocent. After the trial, Scout realises
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But the most important lesson that she learns is that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird. In the novel, Scout meets many characters that are symbolised as mockingbirds, including herself. One of these characters is Tom Robinson, who was falsely accused of raping Mayella Ewell. Scout learns that Tom was innocent but the men in the courthouse would never accuse a white man over a black person. The second person whom she meets is Boo Radley, who was misjudged throughout the novel due to the rumors people heard about him. When he finally come out of his house, Scout learns that he is an innocent, who should not be imprisoned for killing Bob Ewell as it would be like killing a mockingbird. Finally, Scout herself is a mockingbird, as she leaves behind her innocence and naivety of her childhood and becomes mature, all due to the events she goes through at a young age. At the end of the novel, Scout learns that one must never judge a person superficially, as he or she may turn out to be a

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