Theme Of Innocence In The Aeneid

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An Internal Coexistence Though most prefer to believe that the soul exists as one entity; uniformly dressed with beliefs of right and wrong, it takes on several forms. We all have experienced moments where we acted outside of our usual habits and went against what was known. In certain situations, this is appropriate as to avoid a outcome with adverse effects. And when one acts without rational thought, the soul takes on a new form, likely driven by an innate fear or anger. As one grows and learns self awareness, they better understand what it is to control their reactions and act efficiently. This no more evident than in The Aeneid, by Virgil. Aeneas takes on several forms throughout his treacherous journey to find Rome; attempting to maintain …show more content…
This undying dedication to the wellbeing of his people serves as another important aspect of Aeneas’ character. Once in Carthage, The Trojans are treated with great hospitality. In part to Venus sending cupid to entice the heart of Dido for Aeneas. Aeneas begins to find himself in a peculiar situation when he begins to fall in love with Dido. Aeneas feels genuine happiness through Dido, something he did not feel since long before the war. One day, while hunting with Dido and several others, Juno sends a storm to isolate Aeneas and Dido together. Rumors spread amongst the kingdom that the two are to be married. Abhorred by the events happening in Carthage, Jupiter sends Mercury to relay his message. Mercury says to Aeneas, “Are you now laying the foundation of high Carthage, as servant to a woman, building her a splendid city here? Are you forgetful of what is your own kingdom, your own fate? (IV.353-357). Aeneas soon realises that he has been blind to his true task at hand. Despite the happiness and prosperity that Aeneas and his people experience in Carthage, Aeneas goes against his immediate desire and gets his people back on track to find Rome. This ultimately has dire effects on Dido, who kills herself knowing she is to never find love again. Aeneas decision to flee Carthage displays the development of his position as a …show more content…
Despite the negative connotation surrounding furor, Aeneas is able to instill a common determination amongst people during the attack on Troy. The flames of his anger spread like a wildfire and unify the Trojans in a time of despair. This quality is an important aspect of Aeneas’ character because great leaders need to be able to convince each of their followers to fight for a common goal. By doing this, they become stronger as a unit rather than a self opposing force. What seems to set apart Aeneas from any other leader is his undying commitment to piety. Even when he could have easily found happiness for himself, he sees the long term future of the Trojans as much more important. This selflessness progresses gradually in Aeneas, but by the end of the epic, defines him. Aeneas finds a balance between these two qualities when he realises his pious duty to Pallas, and releases his fury on Turnus. With piety and fury working in tandem, Aeneas ends the war and is ultimately able to avenge the loss of his dear Pallas. For anyone who desires to pursue a position of leadership they should pay close attention to the story of Aeneas. Though several believe that all it takes to be a leader is power and strength, it takes a selfless and courageous individual who can unite people towards a common goal. Though

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