The Writing Style Of Beloved By Toni Morrison

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Beloved (check MLA format for how to handle book titles- not sure if you should italicize, underline or what- but check) by Toni Morrison is a novel of deep meanings focusing on the conflicts of life, death, time, love, (use commas in a series) and the ugliness of slavery. In addressing such deep subject matters Morrison writes in a very specific and unique way. Morrison’s individual writing style is widely present throughout the entire novel shaping each phrase and putting meaning into the simplest of words. One passage in which Morrison uses her style to convey meaning is the passage in which Denver and seethe discus rememories. The passage primarily focuses on rememory a term unique to the novel. Morrison crafting the passages language …show more content…
Sweet home is the primary example within the passage. Sethe assures herself and Denver that the events at sweet home are “all over- over and done with”, yet sweet home is described as “waiting” and “it will be there for you”. Sethe also says “it’s never going away. Even if the whole farm-every tree and grass blade of it dies” (43). The concept of nothing dieying is not expressed as a pleasant one. Sweet home for instance is not just an undead past but a past full of horror that is now constantly “waiting” for seethes children. Morrison’s choice of the word waiting is sinister and foreshadowing giving sweet home an air of melcios blood thirstiness. Furthermore the fact that Morrison only refers to the rememory sweet home as “it” connotatively recalls images of scfi monster waiting in the dark. Morrison does not just chose to express the idea of nothing dying for the purpose of this passage alone. Her choice of the word “nothing” is a reference to the character beloved as well as the other rememorys such as school teacher present in the …show more content…
Morrison devolpes this side of Sethes character in a few concise lines. Sethe says “that’s how come I had to get all my children out. No matter what.” “No matter what” is a vague simplistic term but as used within the passage it is deceptively chilling and foreshadowing. It suggest that seethe will or has overcome something insurmountable to do as she says “get all my children out” and keep them there. The simplicity is also a reflection of seethe herself while her character may seem a complex one Morrison sums her up in this one phrase. Further in to the book Morrison says “To Sethe the future was about keeping the past at bay” (51). Sethes every motivation seems to be prompted by her need to keep her children away from sweet home. It is significant that sethe says “I had” instead of I wanted to or I needed to or any other word. Had once again is a simple word that in Morrison’s hands is transformed in to a powerful word. In this case the use of had implies that for Sethe there was no choice she “had” to do it. Even 18 years later she is still compelled to relentlessly keep her children away. Morrison says “As far Denver, the job Sethe had of keeping her from the past that was still waiting for her was all that mattered” (51) the passage in its self is just sethe trying to keep Denver from sweet home as she insists over and over “So Denver you can’t

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