The Woman Who Dared To Vote: The Women's Movement

Great Essays
While the women’s movement during Susan B. Anthony’s time was forming it still had much more room to grow before it began a national issue during the time. Their issues were legitimate concerns for women, but, people wanted to ensure the protection of African-Americans, in particular black men during this period. Unfortunately, Anthony’s issues with others would become secondary, and it stalled progress for women nationally for many years. It took until the Nineteenth Amendment, passed in 1920, which gave the right for women to vote. The betrayal from abolitionists who used them to further advance their plans to Black men rights in the country had a negative effect on the women’s movement (Hull 15). It split supported as some women wanted to help and others like Anthony thought it was noble but wanted to advance the women’s movement (Hull 18-21). N.E.H. Hull describes these conflicts and more in her book, “The Women Who Dared to Vote: The Trial of Susan B. …show more content…
In the midst of the Progressive Era, there were reforms and regulations to make society better for all, and not only the wealthy class. But the Lochner case showed that the Supreme Court did not like having government interfering in businesses with economic regulation (Kens 129). Kens discusses this dilemma in a new era in American legal history known as the Lochner era. The Supreme Court decisions during this period went against the tide of the country that wanted social reforms. Even President Roosevelt, a famed Progressive reformer disliked the Supreme Court ideology. Kens writes that Roosevelt says of the Supreme Court, “well-nigh or altogether insurmountable obstacles in the path of needed social reforms” (Kens 154). His claims are debated by scholars who do not liked that label placed on the Supreme Court and some even say the court was for reforms but needed different wording (Kens

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