The Whiskey Revolution

Improved Essays
Economic: 1790- 1860*
In 1790 to 1860, there were plenty of treaties, acts, and battles going on.

In 1794, President George Washington sent John Jay to London, to avoid war with Britain. John Jay had to negotiate with the British to remove their forts from the U.S soil, including their troops, and to stop supplying weapons to Indians. This was known as the Jay Treaty. After the negotiation, the British still maintained trading posts on U.S soil and sold firearms to Indians. The British told the U.S that they will remove their forts only if the U.S payed their old debts on the Revolution accounts.

On March 1796, Thomas Pinckney negotiated with Spain. This was the Pinckney Treaty, in which Spain gave U.S free use of the Mississippi River for
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The ones refusing to pay were the Whiskey Rebels. The rebels were attacking tax collectors and threatened to attack the town near Pittsburgh. The Whiskey Rebellion showed the power of the national government and was just testing the power of the new Constitution. It demonstrated people that the new Constitution was powerful enough to take down a “mobocracy.”

John Adams wanted to prevent having a war with France, so he decided to send John Jay, John Marshall , and Charles Pinckney, the U.S House of Representatives, to negotiate a peace treaty with France. When they got to France, they met three French Representatives, who referred to themselves as the XYZ. The XYZ wanted a bribe of $250,000 to speak with the Tallyrand, which was the XYZ Affair.

Between 1798 to 1800, the Federalists and Congress passed the Alien Act and Sedition Act. The Alien Act was aimed towards the immigrants. If President John Adams thought there was an immigrant that was a threat to national security, he was able to deport them. The years for becoming a citizen was also changed. It was now in 5 to 14 years that an immigrant could be a citizen. In the Sedition Act, Adams had the power to put someone in jail, if they said anything that was against the government and war effort. This act was primarily against the Jeffersons Democratic- Republicans and newspaper editors who opposed the
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This act prohibited trade with Britain and France, but offered to resume trade with any nation that brought back its’ neutral trading limitations first. In 1810, Napoleon Bonaparte, lies about putting an end to impressment towards the U.S because they did it afterwards. James Madison declared non- importation against the British and later on the U.S and Britain go to war. The ones that wanted to go to war against the British were the War Hawks because they wanted to protect their neutrality and they had the desire for Canada, including Florida. The reason why they fought the British was because impressment was affecting the economy, so they had to prevent impressment from

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