The Wars Of Watergate Summary

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Speak the words presidential scandal, and what goes through a person’s mind is Watergate. This scandal set a precedent for all other scandals. What started as a promising presidential career for Richard Nixon, quickly turned into the largest and most devastating scandals the United States has ever known. It was June 1972 a five man crew of Cuban descent were apprehended by the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, DC, in the offices of the Democratic National Committee. The report revealed that the crew was in possession of wiretapping equipment and cameras . Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, junior staffers for the Washington Post were on hand to break the story to the American people . This was no ordinary burglary; it garnered …show more content…
He asserts that the beginning of Richard Nixon’s problems with the press started with America’s golden child, John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Lyndon Johnson became the interim president and a target for the news media. However, this negative campaign against Johnson by the media was not exactly deserved. During the next six months Johnson and pushed through more legislation than Kennedy ever did. Still the press hounded him relentlessly, one account by “English journalist Henry Fairlie was appalled: “I have found nothing more strange than the way in which American intellectuals take pleasure in the reviling president Johnson” this is a beginning point of hostilities between presidential administrations and the national press. As much as Johnson did manage to become president elect on his own he did not soften the blows from the press. Therefore, his decision not to run for reelection opens the doors Richard Nixon in …show more content…
He provides details long forgotten by the American population. Although, Brands covered the basics in his book “American Dreams” his purpose was to inform his readers, in order for them to have a basic understanding of the major points of the Watergate scandal. Where, Kutler’s book “The Wars of Watergate: the Last Crisis of Richard Nixon” is an in-depth study of not only the Watergate scandal but of years leading up to and after the closing of this event. Both authors do their best and including and credit Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein for their coverage of the exploding Watergate scandal, and they will be remembered in the annals of American journalism. However, they were not working alone Mark Felt better known, as Deep Throat was their secret informant. Kutler states “My publication of the first new tapes in 1997 revealed that Richard Nixon knew in October 1972 that Mark Felt was “leaking” but chose not to do anything for fear that Felt knew too many damning secrets of the administration” . Both Brands and Kutler are well-known historical authors with several titles associated with their names. Brands has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and Kutler has been awarded the Guggenheim or Fellowship for humanities. They are considered trusted sources with the desire to provide accurate,

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