The Watchmen Literary Analysis

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The story of the Watchmen relies on its plot and personalities of the both the protagonists and antagonists to exude the conflict within the dystopian society. Watchmen is set in an alternate reality of the 1930s to 1980s. With the help of the Watchmen, a team a crime-fighter vigilantes, the USA is successful in the Vietnam War. But even with this diversion from the current reality, the US still engages in the nuclear, tension-driven Cold War with the Soviet Union. In response, the “Nuclear Doomsday Clock” was created to symbolize the proximity that the world was to nuclear destruction. In the graphic novels of the same name, appearances of the clock show the hands inching closer and closer to midnight, further revealing how close humanity …show more content…
Paul Youngquist (2013) states that, after the quarrel of the two, Dr. Manhattan was essential to the safety of the global society through his “godly” presence unintentionally preventing either side from fully engaging in mutually assured destruction (MAD), a military tactic where both blocs can annihilate the one another with the use of weapons of mass destruction, which in this case is nuclear bombs. After Manhattan’s disappearance to Mars due to an existential crisis involving his effect on loved ones, the USSR invades Afghanistan with the threat of a torrent of nuclear bombings under any action of retaliation by the US (Youngquist, 2013). Adrian Veidt (Ozymandias) takes advantage Dr. Manhattan’s relationship with both nations to unite them into peace via fabricating a plot codenamed “Sub-Quantum Unified Intrinsic Field Device” (S.Q.U.I.D.), which assigned blame onto Manhattan by leaving his energy trace in the demolition aftermath of New York City, therefore causing the nations to unite against Manhattan, who has already left to a new planet (Snyder, 2009). Adrian answers the questions of how the political systems of the countries create an inevitable state of doom and devastation, and also helps the audience recognize the

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