The Victorian Period In Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

1373 Words 6 Pages
The Victorian Period, the most important time in British history. This Period started with Queen Victoria’s rise to power in 1837 and ended with her death in 1901, thus ending the Victorian Period. Through this era, many changes occurred, from scientific improvements to population growth. Even though it started with many problems many of them were already improved by the end of the Victorian Period. For starters, one of the biggest improvements was the steam engine, which even though it was already created, it wasn’t until the 19th century that some Victorian engineers were able to make them more efficiently. Consequently, many of the citizens living in the countryside were replaced by these machines and had to move to the cities in search …show more content…
In addition, education was different between those with money and those without it. For example, those with money were thought by tutors while the rest were thought in poorly constructed schools with ill teachers. On the other hand, literature was increasing and eventually novels became the most popular form of literature, which is what the rest of this essay will talk about. The first novel that I’ll be talking about is Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. This novel starts with Lockwood, one of two narrators, who arrives at Wuthering Height and stays due to the snow. Then, the second narrator of the story, Nelly Dean, tells Lockwood the story of the family. To begin with, she tells him of how 30 years earlier Mr. Earnshaw brought home a child, Heathcliff, saying he found him in the streets of London. He grew up with Mr. Earnshaw’s son, Hindley, and daughter, Catherine. He spent his time with Catherine with whom he grew close while Hindley felt jealous, thinking his father loved Heathcliff more than him. In effect, he became very hateful of Heathcliff and is later sent to college far away from home …show more content…
This novel starts when Jane Eyre is still a young orphaned girl in the custody of her aunt, Mrs. Reed. In her care she is being treated badly by everyone except for Bessie, a servant. Eventually, she goes to a school in which she’s treated badly again but manages to make a friend called Helen. Afterward, typhus goes through Lowood and Helen dies; however, this causes Mr. Brocklehurst to leave and some gentlemen take over the school, making it a better environment which improves Jane’s life. After eight more years she decides to take a job as a governess at a manor called Thornfield. She falls in love with her employer, Rochester, and eventually he proposes to her to which she accepts. Not long after, it’s their wedding day and as they’re going to exchange vows Mr. Mason says that Rochester already has a wife named Bertha. He admits to that but says she’s become mad. As a result, Jane flees Thornfield and is forced to live outside with no money or food until 3 siblings, Mary, Diana, and St. John find her. After a while, St. John tells Jane that her uncle had died leaving her 20,000 pounds, then he also tells her that her uncle was his uncle making them cousins. St. John decides to travel to India and take Jane with him as his wife but she declines because she didn’t love him. She then decides to back to one man she truly loves, Rochester, and goes back to Thornfield and finds it burned to the ground by Bertha who

Related Documents