The Value Of Freedom Of Speech

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Freedom of speech can be debated on whether or not there should be boundaries to it or not and on what is considered freedom of speech. The First Amendment affirmed that "Congress shall make no law...abridging freedom of speech" but based on www.legal-dictionary.the free dictionary.com it states' All speech is not equal under the First Amendment. The high court has identified five areas of expression that the government may legitimately restrict under certain circumstances. These areas are speech that incites illegal activity and subversive speech, fighting words, obscenity and pornography, commercial speech, and symbolic expression'. On this information and amongst other I believe that freedom of speech is both restricted to a fault and abused. …show more content…
The notion that somebody deserves to have their life and career ruined for tweeting an offensive comment or bad joke is an out-of-proportion response, driven by righteous indignation." There is an article found on the website bleacherreport.com about the Hank Williams Jr., Obama controversy that proves how delicate freedom of speech is." Because people who are heavily involved in the public, such as celebrities and radio personalities are seen and heard by such a massive audience, their "freedom" is often limited due to the magnifying glass typically hovering over their worlds. There are two sides to every argument. Some people strive to use the freedom of speech excuse whenever something controversial arises. Others, wish to crash down upon it because it crosses one of the generally accepted lines we have come to know in society Hank Williams Jr., the musician best noted for ushering us into Monday Night Football for the past 20 years, shockingly compared Speaker of the House, John Boehner, and President Obama playing golf together similar to Adolf Hitler and (Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin) Netanyahu pairing up, people took notice. …show more content…
The faster, easier, and cheaper it becomes to communicate, the more readily we will abuse our freedom of speech, having felt empowered by tools we may not understand. This problem grew with the advent of email, and with the birth of blogging, some took it upon themselves to publicly police the world and their areas of interest. So rather than abusing our freedom of speech, I propose we respect it." By Listening, and then listening again, before reacting, thinking before speaking, and showing empathy just to name a few ways, which are easy and could really change things. Cox's article corresponds well with an eye-opening statement on awareci.com about why people often think the statements they make are out of freedom of speech instead of abuse of it," Anybody who tries to justify abuse using arguments that they support freedom of speech is confusing “freedom of speech” with “free speech”. Freedom of Speech is the right to communicate opinions and ideas – and censoring these is one of the first signs of a restrictive society that can, and does, lead to totalitarianism. It is not, however, a right to “free speech” where you can call for the rape of women, or abuse others through words or images.

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