The Use Of Satire In Huckleberry Finn, By Mark Twain

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Since the 16th century, writers have been using satire as a way to broadcast their message to their readers, while also attempting to make the read more enjoyable; with this, Mark Twain was no exception. Throughout the book, Twain mocked five main parts, which included sentimentality and gullibility, romantic literature with its mournful subject matter in poetry and its ridiculous plots in the novel, the average man, religious dogma, and a code of honor that results in needless bloodshed. One of the main parts of the book Mark Twain mocked was the sentimentality and gullibility that took place. Throughout the novel, Twain makes fun of sentimentality when he has Huck do certain things, like sending a ferry for the people on the Walter Scott …show more content…
Through Emmeline Grangerford’s poems about deceased people, Mark Twain teases the mournful subject matter of romantic literature. This is because even though, the poems were of an awful subject, the readers found it to be a bit humorous. Twain also mocks the ridiculous plots that are set up in the book. He does this through Tom’s elaborate plans that only cause more – and frankly, unnecessary – work for both Jim and Huck when they are trying to break Jim out of his imprisonment at the Phelps’ farm. Throughout the book, Huck also references how Tom would be proud of him when Huck fakes his own death, or goes exploring on the sinking Walter Scott, which further reinforces the idea that Tom likes dramatic and ridiculous plans. The influence under these topics is also high for the readers because it can show them that not everything can be extravagant and fun, it also has to be …show more content…
Here he showcases how, in society, the average man always should follow the same routine every day. For example, in chapter 21, how the townsmen had continuously fought over chewing tobacco, as if it were a daily and normal thing to do. In chapter 22, when the town went to lynch Colonel Sherburn for killing Boggs, Sherburn lectures them on how the ‘average’ people should usually lynch someone. These examples highlight how Twain mocks societies idea of an ‘average man’. The reader influence in this portion would be moderate because it does not necessarily alter the reader’s personal view, though it does show the readers how many people simply follow what everyone else is doing and not having a mind of their

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