The Use Of Roger Chillingworth In Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter

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In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, he presents antagonistic Roger Chillingworth as he focuses his life on seeking revenge on Reverend Dimmesdale, wearing down his prosperous intelligence, and taking over his mental functions by transforming him into an identifiable diabolic embodiment. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter employs begrimed diction, despicable tone towards Chillingworth, and satanic metaphors to accentuate the counteracting and pernicious repercussions within cynical ambitions of vengeance for Reverend Dimmesdale by focusing on Roger Chillingworth’s destruction from his prosperous precocity to the malevolence of his spiteful life. Hawthorne conveys Hester’s shock from the discerning changes Chillingworth seizes …show more content…
To reiterate, Lucifer’s demise was derived from his “corrupted wisdom.” Satan and Chillingworth parallel because their intellect corrupts them, and is the basis for their entire downfall. They persistently attempt to use it to their advantage to seek retribution from his enemy. Chillingworth strives to “interfere with Heaven’s own method of retribution, or to my own loss, betray him to the gripe of human law” (52). He believes that his own intelligence will over power Heaven’s plan; therefore, he is taking any means to achieve vengeance against Reverend Dimmesdale. Unfortunately for his case, he never attains his happiness, as it is the foundation of hateful and unexecuted actions. Thus, he rots in agony as he is constantly struggling to acquire “the solution of [his] mystery” (52) of how he will demean Dimmesdale. Chillingworth’s representation of the devil signifies that his immoral actions lead him to become a spiritually corrupt embodiment of superlative animosity. Although he was never pure, his fate of becoming an absolute figure of enormity was determined by his continual focus of his noxious actions and …show more content…
When Chillingworth places someone’s fate in his hands, he becomes delirious and is in a continuous state of hatred. While he “ma[kes] the very principle of his life to consist in the pursuit and systematic exercise of revenge” (177), he emanates atrocity as he is unable to completely achieve his goal from calamitous actions of devastation. Therefore, Chillingworth demonstrates the detrimental repercussions that developed from devoting his life to finding vengeance, as it dictates and inhibits his life, his passion, and his function in society to only serve as the epitome of

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