The Use Of Foreshadowing In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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As time gradually ticks into the unfaltering future moments that are experienced in the past are brought up in new rather identical ways. This can be best explained as foreshadowing or an indication of what is to come. Foreshadowing is a faddish literary device used by a copious amount of authors. Much like the American author John Steinbeck who is most famous for his books; Of Mice and Men, Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden,etc. Steinbeck uses foreshadowing in the most subtle of ways like in the novel Of Mice and Men which is based on a poem entitled To a Mouse written by Robert Burns. Steinbeck uses main characters Lennie and George who face great difficulty in their journey as migrant workers who are striving for their dream of a ranch …show more content…
The title of Of Mice and Men is an allusion to the poem written by Scottish poet Robert Burns entitled “To a Mouse”. To a Mouse explains how a tiny mouse's expectations do not go as planned and how that has put the mouse in a sticky situation. In fact not only is the title Of Mice and of Men, but is pulled directly for the poem. In stanza seven of the poem the man speaks to the mouse and says “But Mouse, you are not alone,... The best laid schemes of mice and men go often askew,...”. Steinbeck uses this as a handy piece of information to the reader because it helps the reader predict what is to come. In the poem “To a Mouse” the mouse loses its home and all of its intentions go off course the foreshadows to the intentions of the men in the book Of Mice and Men. The men named Lennie and George have their plans go askew when they lose work in Weed after getting in a sticky situation and now have to find work somewhere else in order to continue to make money. Even though they do eventually find work they have problems with come up with the money they need to buy the ranch that they want. The original plans of the men continue to go off of course until the end of the book, but there is always a hint to what is …show more content…
Steinbeck no longer uses cunning ways to hide his indications instead he uses blunt information. Lennie death is related to the death of Candy’s dog from how he is shot to the reason. Candy’s dog is considered no good to Candy as explained by Carlson. Carlson goes on to tell Candy that he’d outta shoot the to end it’s pain stating “...Shoot him right in the back of the dead… He won't even quiver. After the long debate Carlson pulls out his bag from underneath his bunk pulls out his lugger, then takes the gun out then shoot Candy’s dog the way he had explained it before. When confronted afterwards Candy expresses his pain for not shooting his dog stating "I ought to of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn't ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog.” the demonstrates the pain that Candy went through letting someone else beside him kill someone whom he cared about. This links back to Lennie and George, with Lennie being no good to George when all he ever does is constantly gets in trouble and has to have George bail him out. However, George cared about Lennie and since he had promised Lennie’s aunt Clara to take care of him the was what he was going to do. Sadly, Lennie’s troublesome ways come up, but this time it is unfixable. Lennie had snapped the neck of Curley’s wife and left her body in the barn. George hopes that they’ll only lock up Lennie since he know that he

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