The Use Of Double Meaningss In William Shakespeare's Hamlet

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People like to say things that have double meanings, like inside jokes or saying things that actually has more depth to it than one can normally perceive. In the play Hamlet, written by William Shakespeare, the main character, Hamlet, talks about things by often times using double meanings. He may say things in a certain way so that way he would not get in trouble. Or, Hamlet may also say things that have more depth to them so that way he could hide what he means, especially when he is speaking with King Claudius. Hamlet’s use of double meanings in his speech plays an important role throughout the play, adding depth to his character and making the play more thought provoking. In addition, it reveals the relationship of hatred between King Claudius …show more content…
It is interesting how Hamlet starts out by using double meanings, and especially in his opening lines. This quote takes place when Hamlet is in the king’s court, and the king is giving Laertes his blessing to go back to France. After that, Hamlet mutters,”A little more than kin and less than kind” (1.2.65). Hamlet is overall commenting about the king and his mother’s incestous marriage. King Claudius has become more than just his “kin” which is family and turned into less of his “kind.” The “less than kind” means that Claudius has become Hamlet’s stepfather, but will never be Hamlet’s real father. Hamlet uses “kind” to say that he does not want Claudius to be a part of his life, and also in the more colloquial and familiar sense that he does not like the new king. He is saying that he is going to be “less than kind” to King …show more content…
When he asks why Horatio was in Elsinore and not at college at Wittenberg, Horatio says that he was there to attend King Hamlet’s funeral, but Hamlet calls him out on it saying that he was really there for the wedding between Claudius and Hamlet’s mother, Gertrude. When Horatio points out that the funeral and the wedding were close, Hamlet says, “ Thrift, thrift, Horatio! The funeral baked meats did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables. Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven or ever I had seen that day, Horatio.” Hamlet points out that the two events were so close that they used the same meat that was earlier baked, and was used for cold cuts for the wedding meal. He is saying through this quote that his mother could not wait to have another husband and married right after King Claudius had died. Hamlet dreaded this so much that he would rather die than to see it

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