The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights: The Affordable Care Act

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Health care has been a hot topic for debate over the last eight years of Obama’s two terms as President. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in March of 2010, known culturally as ‘Obamacare’, the hopes of increasing the availability and affordability of health insurance for both individuals and employers seemed plausible. President Obama planned to reduce the American uninsured rate via individual mandates, requiring those not covered by an employer health program—or other public insurance program—to purchase a private insurance policy. Those who fell below the federal poverty line received tax-refundable subsidies to help pay for the premiums. In theory, this seems like a good idea. According to a survey conducted by the Center …show more content…
Various human rights organizations have established and prioritized health care as a right to all humans. This idea—health care as a right to all—is not new. After World War II, there was a need to amply define human rights, which were clearly violated by Nazi Germany. So in 1948, the “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” was created, validating a myriad of declarations that would hopefully make the world a much more habitable place. From Article 25 of the Declaration: “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services…” This made it clear that a government’s job was to provide and maintain the freedoms and liberties of its citizens, including—but not limited to—health …show more content…
As stated before, the U.S. pays far more for health care than any other nation in the world. And compared to our neighbor Canada, which adapted a single-payer health care system in 1966, called the ”Medical Care Act”, they spend much less than us—around $1,000 less per person. They also spend $250 less on pharmaceuticals per person, all while having virtually the same amount of doctors (2.6 doctors per 1,000 inhabitants for the United States, 2.5 for Canada). (OECD) This all occurs despite the fact that Canada has a lower GDP than the U.S. by a margin of about $4,000. Not to mention several other countries who guarantee health care for their citizens while have a smaller GDP, such as the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Finland. (The World

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