The U-Curve Theory Of Adjustment: A Study

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A study by Eschbach, Parker, and Stoeberl (2001) examined the effect of cross-cultural training of expatriates versus expatriates who received no training in the United States. Beyond this, they further investigated different training methods and the timing of such training to determine the best approach to prepare expatriates for adjusting to their new assignments. The goal of this study was to determine if cross-cultural training; helps participants realize appropriate behavior, lowers stress levels, shrinks the time of acclimation to a new environment, and produces higher performing employees. “It was hypothesized that managers who receive rigorous cross-cultural training before and during the assignment will not suffer intense culture shock …show more content…
The researchers found supporting evidence for this theory as they began their work (Eschbach, Parker, and Stoeberl 271). Continuing to explore the stress caused by cross-cultural adjustment, the researchers discuss the work of Guthrie on cultural fatigue, which is not a severe as cultural shock. However, fatigue of the differing cultural is paramount for an individual to begin the process of assimilating into the culture of the host country. Finally, they present the work of DiMarco on Fink’s four individual reactions to sudden stress, which DiMarco suggest line up with the four stages of adjustment outlined previously (Eschbach, Parker, and Stoeberl …show more content…
Forty-seven responded to questionnaires that two hundred and fifty companies with operations in at least three counties mailed out to former expatriates. The researchers interviewed by telephone another thirty-two repatriates using the same questions as those on the mailed questionnaire. Both methods were coded to assess any differences between responses provided by the repatriates responding by mail versus those who were interviewed by phone and no statistical differences were found (Eschbach, Parker, and Stoeberl 275). The respondents surveyed represented a cross section of industries, education levels, experience levels, jobs held, age, marital status, sex, number of children, and cultural difficulty. The questions asked focused on general adjustment, interactional adjustment, job adjustment, effectiveness, communications, self-maintenance, relational skills, perceptual skills, and level of cross-cultural training

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