Comparing The Tuft Of Flowers And Big World

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Discoveries made by individuals will undoubtedly transform them, where it be a positive or negative transformation. This can be seen in the poems by Robert Frost, namely ‘The Tuft of Flowers’ and ‘Stopping by woods on a snowy evening’, and also in the short story ‘Big World’ by Tim Winton. In ‘Stopping by woods on a snowy evening’ the speaker makes a discovery on his own perceptions of the world round him and how he must change in order to fulfil his responsibilities. Similarly, in ‘A Tuft of Flowers’, the speaker’s original pessimistic and negative view of the world around him is transformed trough the discovery of a friendship. Similar to these poems, Tim Winton’s ‘Big World’ tells the story of the narrator as he makes his own discoveries …show more content…
Initially the narrator utilises descriptive language and imagery to portray the friendship between the two. The language also hints towards the belief they hold that they’ll be friends forever. Seen in the idea of “moving with the seasons” which is a long-term goal for the two. Only once the two are separated for a period of time does the narrator discover how unsuitable their friendship is if he wants to achieve his goals. This discovery is a complete opposite from that in ‘The Tuft of Flowers’ since in this poem, the discovery of a friendship is beneficial for the speaker. Later in the story, the narrator is constantly referring to his mother’s opinion on their friendship, who refers the two to be similar to Lenny and George from ‘Of mice and men’. The use of intertextuality here allows readers to further relate to the two characters. This change throughout the short story is evident that the narrator’s discoveries have effectively transformed …show more content…
The unique rhyming patterns seen in the first two stanzas use appealing imagery to make the woods seem more inviting than the path forward. The personification of his horse in the quote “my little horse must think it queer, to stop without a farmhouse near” shows that the speaker has never stopped to think of the outside world, free from his responsibilities. This horse can represent the speaker, following the same path constantly without deviation. The horse also serves as a reminder to the speaker to remain on task, seen in the quote “gives his harness bells a shake”, this sends the speaker back into reality to continue along the path. The final stanzas repetition of the phrase “and miles to go before I sleep” puts an emphasis upon his responsibilities, and how long he has to go on his journey. The transformation the speaker faces here is similar to ‘Big World’ where the narrator is transformed by his discovery of wanting to leave his friend. These factors show the changes and transformations that the speaker undergoes, and how his discoveries ultimately transform

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