Essay about The Trolley Driver And Transplant Cases

751 Words Sep 13th, 2015 4 Pages
When addressing the Trolley Driver and Transplant cases, philosophers and non-philosophers alike tend to run into a moral problem. In both cases, the doctor and the trolley driver have to choose between intervening with the problem in which they are facing, which in both cases will save five people and kill one person, or letting the problem run its course, which will save only one person’s life and kill five people. The common problem philosophers face with these two cases is that the majority of people believe it is morally permissible to intervene in the Trolley Driver case, but morally impermissible to intervene in the Transplant case. How could this possibly make sense if the two cases are structured the same? Should a person always want to save as many lives as they can or is that case dependent? The Trolley Driver and Transplant cases present a problem where we try to figure out why different people have different moral obligations in similarly structured situations. The many solutions philosophers have thought of for the Trolley Driver and Transplant cases can be discussed essentially forever.
One of the solutions to this philosophical puzzle could be that killing is significantly worse than letting die. In the Trolley Driver and Transplant cases, the choices the doctor and the trolley driver have to make may seem very similar, but indeed they are not. In the Trolley Driver case, he could either continue on his track and kill five people or turn off his track and…

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