The Trojan War In Homer's The Aeneid

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Whenever children are being forced to read Virgil’s Aeneid in English class, they consider the story to be about an intense battle between two strong groups of people; although, what many of us do not understand is that the battle is not just physical, it is mental as well. If you look up the definition of “naive” on Urban Dictionary, you see words relating to it such as “stupid”, “gullible”, and “ignorant”. These words relate to the epic tale called the Aeneid; which, is written by Virgil. The Aeneid’s “enemy” is a story called the Iliad and Odyssey. The Iliad and Odyssey are written by Homer. Homer’s take on the Trojan War is biased towards Troy. Homer explains the Trojan War in a way that makes people think the Trojans are foolish …show more content…
Although, the Trojan, Laocoon tried to warn Aeneas about the trickery by saying, “I fear the Greeks, especially bearing gifts.” (2.1-2) The reasoning that the Trojans have for letting the horse inside their empire is because of the tale of Sinon. Sinon was a Greek man who delivered the horse to the Trojans. Sinon created a convincing story, making the Trojans believe that the Greeks have betrayed him and that the horse was a simple offering for the goddess Minerva. Virgil explains how the Trojans accept the offering due to their generosity and kindness. As many can tell, Sinon clearly took advantage of the Trojans sympathy is able to sneak the horse inside of the walls of …show more content…
Aeneas gathers up his soldiers and surprises the Greeks, who are attacking the Trojan empire. Several Trojan soldiers were killed by other Trojans, because they make the mistake of wearing Greek armor. One of the Trojans described this event by saying, “We all went after him, our swords at play, But here, here first, from the temple gable 's height, We met a hail of missiles from our friends, Pitiful execution, by their error, Who thought us Greek from our Greek plumes and shields.” (2.540-544) Their original plan of Coroebus was to “take their shields and put on their insignia! Trickery, bravery: who asks, in war? The enemy will arm us.” (2.516-518) Aeneas and his soldiers do end up killing some of the Greeks, but they are greatly outnumbered; which is another factor that lead to the defeat of the Trojan empire. A quote explaining the naive decisions of the Trojans is, “..four times it stalled before the gateway, at the very threshold; four times the arms clashed loud inside its belly. Nevertheless, heedless, blinded by frenzy, we press right on and set the inauspicious monster inside the sacred fortress. '" (2.335-339) Virgil describes this event, not so much as a defeat, but as a potential victory. Virgil basically explains how the positive qualities of the Trojans is the reasoning for their

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