The Triumph Of Good Over Evil In John Knowles's A Separate Peace

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In A Separate Peace by John Knowles, the main character states, “I could never agree with either of them. It would have been comfortable, but I could not believe it. Because it seemed clear that wars were not made by generations and their special stupidities, but that wars were made instead by something ignorant in the human heart” (201). Here, the ignorance rooted in the human heart is that towards good and truth. When a person is blinded by his own selfishness, he breaks away from the understood standard of decent morality to prepare to fight in war for what he wants. Consequently, those battling against the good receive the label of evil. Therefore, the triumph of good over evil is an important universal theme to analyze in order to help …show more content…
Spectators may not see the beneficial side of war for they are too distracted by the blood, violence, and loss involved in warfare. Regrettably, this could be the catalyst that causes society to question the foundation of war leaving a sense of distrust. Ultimately in combat, virtuous ideals need to be victorious over the schemes that are embedded in the wicked depths of man which will then aid in restoring the people’s confidence when their country takes part in war. Achievement such as this can be seen through America’s involvement in the American Revolution in books, the Civil War in speeches, WW II in interviews, the Cold War in lecture notes, and the Korean War in textbooks. One war that has proved this theme true is the American Revolution. During the 1770’s, colonists lived in North America under British rule. They had grown more than uneasy because Britain was treating them harshly through trade, taxes, and temperament. In the affairs of trade, the United Kingdom tended to be unjust towards the immigrants in North America. George Washington would often complain that London would “ ‘palm sometimes old, …show more content…
The Union, the Northern part of America, was in combat against the Confederacy, the Southern region of America, over one question: should slavery be abolished? In his “Peoria Speech,” Abraham Lincoln said, “If the negro is a man, why then my ancient faith teaches me that ‘all men are created equal;’ and that there can be no moral right in connection with one man’s making a slave of another.” Here, Lincoln expressed the Union’s future motto and incentive in the war; they symbolized the hero. On the other side, there was the Confederate South that proclaimed slavery as being morally right; they were designated as the villain. Frederick Douglass was determined to inspire the attack on the foe and it is evident in his “Men of Color, To Arms!” speech when he says, “Action! Action! not criticism, is the plain duty of this hour. Words are now useful only as they stimulate to blows. The office of speech now is only to point out when, where, and how to strike to the best advantage.” Later, in “Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address,” he gestures to a Union victory by saying, “The progress of our arms… is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.” At the end of the war, the Union truly did emerge as the hero because they had rescued African Americans from slavery. Despite some critics, this war was necessary

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