Reasons For The Trial And Execution Of Louis Xvi

A Series of Unfortunate Events – The Trial and Execution of Louis XVI

Why was Louis XVI overthrown in August 1792?
What were the issues which divided republicans over his fate?

A series of unfortunate events led to the deposition and ultimate execution of Louis XVI in January 1793. Louis’ plight, from the flight to Varennes in June 1791 to the guillotine on 21 January 1793, was one of constant blunders and calamitous decisions. Along with this, Louis was unable to rely on his closest allies, whom in attempts to save him and themselves, brought about his demise with haste. The Republicans of the Convention debated over the means by which Louis should be tried, if he should be tried at all. Furthermore, most polarizing for the Convention
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Although, “As much as war itself, however, Louis feared taking responsibility for its outbreak.” Therefore, this was the reason for Louis re-structuring the Ministry primarily with Girondins, whom recommended a declaration of war against Austria, which Louis hoped would shift the blame away from him and onto those who wanted to see an end to the monarchy. April 20 saw the declaration of war against Austria. At first the rhetoric of the Legislative Assembly coupled with Louis support for the decision, saw a rise in Louis’ popularity. However, after the French armies suffered a series of defeats, the Louis dismissed the Girondin ministers he had put in place for this very reason. It is argued that this act “provided the pretext for the demonstration of 20 June”. To this initial assault on the Tuileries Louis had almost no defence. This was due to Louis’ inability to veto legislation replacing his constitutional bodyguard with national guardsmen on 29 May. It was argued that the constitutional bodyguard had “excessive personal loyalty to a monarch nobody now trusted.” A poignant commentary of the events of 20 June, comes from the American ambassador at the time, he wrote in his diary the day following the riot, “The Constitution this Day has given its last …show more content…
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