The Transformation Of Tragedy In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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The Crucible Analysis Tragedy is a type of literature that involves series of events happening to characters in complex relationships, which lead to an unfortunate end. However, tragedy is a lot more than “the plays in which everyone dies”. On the contrary to comedy, which people “watch” the play, the changes of plot and transformation of characters in tragedy allow people to participate, and thus give them a chance to reflect their definitions of “moral”. Moreover, the imitation of an action of tragedy involves real emotions, and it either purifies the emotions into a positive form or intensifies the emotions into strong distress. Also, there is no tragedy without a tragic hero. The tragic hero’s recognition and fate help readers …show more content…
The Crucible, a famous tragedy, demonstrates a moral lesson by showing struggles that John Proctor has gone through from his confession to he rips off his confession. Depicting John Proctor’s painful psychology and actions, Arthur Miller affirms the importance of staying true to beliefs. Earlier in Act 4, John Proctor decides that he wants his life. However, Arthur Miller manages to show the consequences of lying beyond ruining one’s own reputation. For instance, John Proctor once says, “I have three children—how may I teach them to walk like men in the world, and I sold my friends? (Miller 1332)” Also, Arthur Miller depicted an extremely vivid image of John Proctor’s psychological painfulness between choosing to live, betraying his beliefs of moral and integrity, and choosing to die respectfully. Miller …show more content…
In the play, Giles Corey’s death leads the audience to catharsis. After Giles provides a deposition about Thomas Putnam prompted his “daughter to cry witchery upon George Jacobs (Miller 1299)”, Danforth questions Giles who wrote the deposition and arrests Giles for “contempt for the court (Miller 1299)”. Giles is pressed to death because he refuses to “answer aye or nay to his indictment (Miller 1328)”. Finally, Giles gives them two words, “More weight (Miller 1328)”, and died. The fear of accusations of witchcraft displays when Giles assumes that he will get the writer of Giles’s deposition to trouble even if he only mentions the name. Also, Giles’s last words not only demonstrate his bravery, but also show the audience how ridiculousness and brutality lead a brave man to death. Even though Miller only uses one sentence to summarize the imagery of the way that Giles has been tortured, “Great stones they lay upon his chest until he plead aye or nay (Miller 1328)”, the words are vivid enough to let the audience imagine. Combined with the words that Giles has said, it evokes sympathy and pity toward the brave man among the audience. Additionally, the catharsis rises to climax as the tragic hero reaches his unfortunate

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