Tyranny Shadow Of Democracy Analysis

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The Tyrannical Shadow of Democracy How does a democracy (the regime that most people closely associated with freedom and equality) ever hold the potential of devolving into a Tyranny? Many would say that democracy is the complete opposite of Tyranny but they are actually two sides of the same coin. Democracy contains all the right ingredients for a tyranny to be formed within it, what tyranny is in fact is an extreme version of democracy where the desire for freedom to do what one wants is taken beyond what is needed for oneself. This is shown within Plato’s Republic Book VII-IX, which go into detail on how the regime of democracy plants the seeds of its own destruction through its own very values corrupted …show more content…
He then goes into an analysis of the subject of pleasures which is crucial to both the democratic soul and the tyrannical soul. Socrates states “relief from pain may seem pleasant and bodily pleasures are merely a relief from pain but not true pleasure, the only truly fulfilling pleasure is that which comes from understanding” (583c-585c) the democratic soul does indeed seek bodily pleasures but their needs to be a balance or temperance of those desires in which the tyrannical soul lacks the ability to do. Stated by Socrates “only if the rational part rules the soul, will each part of the soul find its proper pleasure” (586d-587a) The way to prevent the tyrant within the democratic soul from emerging into the world is to find the balance and let the rational part of the soul take charge against those unnecessary desires from completely taking over and changing that democratic soul into its more corrupted form, he ten makes the analogy of the multi-headed beast to illustrate the point of justice and injustice within the

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