How To Prevent Ww2

Improved Essays
During World War II, the German Government was seized by fascist Adolf Hitler, who was responsible for the genocide of countless Jewish citizens. This horrific event is commonly referred to as the Holocaust. While the U.S. took in a limited number of refugees, ultimately, the military took their time to grant freedom to Europe and end Hitler’s reign. The actions that were taken by the United States during this period left citizens divided. There were supporters who believed that a stronger, timelier intervention would have prevented the atrocities that took place. This could have been achieved by not impeding efforts to aid Jewish refugees and having the military target the concentration camps and their rail networks. Others argued that the …show more content…
intervention who believed that America had not done enough to prevent from reaching a catastrophic level. Furthermore, due to influence the country held, there was a moral obligation to use every resource available to provide a safe haven. Violence and persecution toward the Jews had begun in Germany before the Holocaust had begun particularly with the pogroms that began after the annexation of Austria (13). The U.S. could have easily filled the existing immigration quotas without changing any of the laws (13). However, the government was far more occupied with the reelection of Roosevelt, and allowed the anti-Semitism expressed to skew their decision making. Moreover, once the war had been underway, the U.S. government continued to underestimate the severity of the Holocaust after the State Department confirmed millions of lives were already taken. Efforts to offer refuge to Jewish citizens were impeded with the Wagner-Rogers bill being the first. Additionally, pro-intervention supporters were critical of the U.S. military’s strategy once the decision to finally occupy the Nazi territory had been made. The military had “neglected to target the physical apparatus of the Holocaust, such as the rail lines leading to the camps or the camps themselves (1).” By taking a firm stance on the issue at hand in Germany, it would have sent a symbolic message to the world that the genocide taking place was unacceptable. However, …show more content…
intervention versus against U.S. intervention, it is clear to me that America could have done more. In this case scenario, it seemed as if anti-semitism was the driving force against even offering Jewish people refuge. Additionally, while the economic concerns were valid, private organizations and altruistic individuals were more than willing to support refugees without taking from poor Americans (14). While I do not agree with bombing the concentration camps, as how could those be sure the true enemy was being killed, I do agree that efforts to slow down the slaughtering could have made a difference by getting there earlier. Specifically, when the propaganda, and persecution was first being enforced far before the actual killing. It would cost no money in the world to make a statement and an example out of the bigotry taking place by expressing disapproval. But worst of all, no one seemed to take, nor did they properly report, the danger that Jewish citizens were facing. That is unacceptable, especially when there were opportunities to speak up and offer a lending hand. So it is clear to me that the U.S. did not do enough to stop the senseless killing that took place during the

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