The Significance Of Darwin's Theory Of Natural Selection

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Darwin’s theory of evolution is a theory that is universally acclaimed by numerous scientists and citizens. Darwin’s general theory of evolution states that complex creatures such as us have evolved from more simplistic creatures over time and essential genetic mutations are preserved because they act as an aid for survival (Anon. 2002). This process is known as natural selection (Anon. 2002). Subsequently, Darwin argued that natural selection is an inevitable outcome of three principles caused by nature. Firstly, as stated above, the characteristics of a specific organism can be inherited or passed down from parent to offspring; Darwin also stated that the resources for survival are limited thus promoting competition within organisms (Boundless, …show more content…
At first Darwin’s discoveries did not reciprocate any controversy in America till 1925 when Tennessee passed a law outlawing the teaching of evolution, which was part of the rise in fundamentalist thought and anti-Darwinism (8-2 Darwinism II). The echoes of this law still resides today, as when I attended a Catholic school they would not teach anything to do with evolution or Darwinism given that it was a religious contradiction. Yet, the God verses Darwinism debate went on till about the 1960s and within this time period numerous myths arose from the trials that had occurred between scientists, celebrities and preachers, and to this day the reason why some of these trials were fabricated is still not known (8-2 Darwinism II). In particular, from this, the idealism of American Darwinism was brought forth and it was an incredibly popular idea in market economies such as the United States. The main idea of this concept was that those who succeed in life succeed because they deserve to and the rich are just better than you and me so helping the poor is a mistake because it tampers with order (8-2 Darwinism II). This idealism is clearly an unsympathetic way of thinking. On the other hand, Peter and Rosemary Grant continued to study the Galapagos Island Finches populations every year since 1976 and from their discoveries they have found important demonstrations of …show more content…
With the use of evolution, the Galapagos Island finches and the number of scientists and researchers adding to his discoveries, Darwin’s overall reputation was an excellent one. Despite this, whether or not Darwin’s use of the Galapagos Island finches as a base for his discovery of natural selection is still a controversial one. A number of religious institutions still discredit Darwin’s claims about evolution, naming it a myth, whereas scientists such as the Grants strongly believe in his theory and dedicate their research to discovering evidence to back up Darwin’s claim. Subsequently, depending on a person’s view on how we came to be will also determine the way that Darwin’s theories will resonate with

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