The Three Challenges Of Discriminations In The Workplace

1006 Words 5 Pages
“Your services are no longer required.” Several people are told this after finding out they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transsexual (LGBT). This is the discrimination that people of the LGBT community face rather often. It is all because they like someone of the same sex, and that is not equitable treatment to them at all. There are many difficulties that LGBT people face in the workplace, and they fall into three categories. Two main categories apply for these discriminations. There are also plenty of statistics that show the numbers of said discriminations in the workforce; for example, only eighteen states and the District of Columbia contains laws that protect LGBT workers from getting fired. Thankfully, there have been progressions …show more content…
Stereotyping is simply rude and unprofessional, and stereotyping does not belong in the workplace. Another main focus that LGBT people face in the workplace is sexual harassment. This is a major focus because so many LGBT people are faced with this. An example of this sexual harassment is a woman named Ann; she goes on by saying, “I would get hit on by clients quite frequently, even more so after they found out I was a lesbian than when they didn’t know it” (Giuffre, Patti, Kristen Dellinger, and Christine L. Williams, p 264). Sexual harassment should be one of the top things that employees should have protection from, regardless of whether they are homosexuals, bisexuals, or heterosexuals. No one’s sexual orientation should determine whether they are treated differently or not. They are just as human as the rest of humanity, so they should be treated as such. The final focus is gender discrimination. It is sometimes assumed that homosexuals portray characteristics of the “opposite” gender, and yet again this is discrimination. Stephanie, a …show more content…
The first statistic to know is that fifteen to forty-three percent of LGBT workers have experienced some form of discrimination at their job, with eight to seventeen percent being passed over or fired from their job for who they identify as or their sexual orientation. What is even worse is that around ninety percent of transgender workers have experienced some form of harassment at their job (Burns and Krehely, 2011). These are sad statistics because some people do not even get the chance to start a career since there is no protection for LGBT people in some states. The workforce has only four percent that identifies as LGBT (Baksh, 2016). According to the CDC, out of a small population of 34,557 adults, around 96.6% of adults eighteen and up identified as straight, 1.6% identified as gay or lesbian, 0.7% identified as bisexual, and the remaining 1.1% identified as “something else” (Ward, Brian W., Ph.D., James M. Dahlhamer, Ph.D., Adena M. Galinsky, Ph.D., and Sarah S Joestl, Dr.P.H., 2014). This statistic is pretty low and for a reason. Fear keeps LGBT workers closeted because they are terrified of losing touch with coworkers and losing out on

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