The Third Bullet By Arthur Thurber

1197 Words 5 Pages
Register to read the introduction… At school, he developed an interest in drawing, but it was discouraged by his parents. Unable to draw, Thurber eventually found pleasure in writing. In fact, he published his very first story, “The Third Bullet”, in his high school’s magazine. After graduating from East High with honors, Thurber was accepted to the Ohio State University. His experience at Ohio State provided him with even more chances to write and develop his style. In the first few school years, Thurber was very socially awkward, until he met Elliot Nugent. Nugent introduced him to fraternity life and helped him become more …show more content…
His most famous characters, the aggressive, domineering wife; her timid, weak husband; and several peaceful animals, were all commonly seen in his cartoons (Britannica). It was his mother and his wife, both very aggressive women, that influenced the famous “Thurber woman” (Bernstein, 117) and it is thought that Thurber may have based some of the aspects of the “Thurber man” on his father, a silent man with an aspiration to be a lawyer (kirjasto.sci.fi). Thurber’s cartoons gained more attention when he and E.B. White wrote and published their book Is Sex Necessary, a spoof of self-help books that were popular at the time. It was filled with many of Thurber’s cartoons and despite being published soon after the Wall Street Crash of 1929, it sold around fifty thousand copies in its first year. After several years at the New Yorker, Thurber would resign from his position and enter a darker yet more successful period of his life. Although his life after leaving the New Yorker would be marked by numerous tragedies, Thurber would continue to write and eventually gain national attention. After a history of marital conflict and estrangement, Thurber divorced his wife Althea. This, however, …show more content…
Starting in 1939, Thurber started writing fables. His fables, unlike those of Aesop, tried to point out the fact that clichéd pieces of wisdom did not apply to modern times. His morals and stories were sometimes parodies of traditional ones. In the same year, he published his immensely popular short story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”, a piece about a man who escapes into daydreams whenever confronted by one of life’s everyday problems. Thurber would also find success in being a playwright with his play “The Male Animal” becoming successful on Broadway. Although Thurber tended to stay away from politically themed pieces, he published The Last Flower during World War II, voicing his distress at the conflict. By now Thurber had reached a global audience, his works even being referred to as the “standard equipment of the British Intellectual [sic]” (Grauer, 90-91). Despite his rapid achievement, Thurber’s vision would eventually get the better of him. By 1951, Thurber was declared legally blind and his ability to draw came to a screeching halt. His accomplishments however, would not stop. In the early 1950s, Thurber was awarded several honorary doctorates from prestigious institutes

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