The Themes Of Love In The Courtship Of Benedick, And Nothing

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Register to read the introduction… "The courtship of Benedick and Beatrice has a beautiful observed reality, a poise and maturity, a refreshing humour which makes the operatic main plot seem absurdly unreal." It is clear that Beatrice and Benedick are in love from the first we see of them; it is not simply through the Prince's intervention that the seeds of love are sown between them. When Beatrice is informed that Don Pedro and his party are coming to Messina, her first thought is for her 'Senior Mountanto'. Within four spoken lines of his arrival Benedick is quarrelling with his 'Lady Disdain'. From the very beginning then their thoughts and speeches are occupied with each other. The attraction between the lovers manifests itself in a show of hostility. "Their professions of dislike are inverted declarations of love". Their encounters are filled with witty insults and brazen …show more content…
He acts on the strength of his faith in Beatrice's loyal love. This expression of absolute trust highlights the contrast between Benedick's love and Claudio's. Claudio's feelings are clearly shown when Don John unfolds his tale of Hero's lack of sexual virtue. At the conclusion of which Claudio simply utters: May this be so? Claudio is willing to accept the word of the least trusted member of his acquaintance rather than believe in the virtuous nature of his betrothed lady. Had Claudio's love for Hero been all he had imagined it to be, he would have dismissed Don John's claims and believed Hero's assertion of innocence, despite evidence to the contrary. Claudio falls into the trap set for him because Hero is more an image in his mind than a real …show more content…
I will do any modest office, my lord, to help my cousin to a good husband.

Beatrice. Sweet Hero, she is(wronged, she is sland'red, She is undone.

The same is true of the relationship between Claudio and Benedick. Despite the fact that Benedick is said to have 'every month a new sworn brother', he truly cares for his companion and mourns the loss of their friendship when he chooses to 'turn husband'. However, unlike Beatrice, Benedick is persuaded to question his friend's character when he slanders the virtuous Hero. Benedick describes Claudio as having 'the very bent of honor', and yet he still is persuaded to challenge him for his allegedly wrongful treatment of Hero. However, at the play's conclusion, when all is set to rights, Benedick's final words to Claudio are loving: Come, come, we are friends! This public pronouncement of love echoes the sentiments felt by all of the play's 'good' characters. Here Shakespeare establishes his high regard for friendship by using it to unite the characters of the play to produce the anticipated happy

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