Figurative Language In Shakespeare's Sonnet 30

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Throughout history, the transition from old english to new has unequivocally reshaped the way we communicate through rhyme. Whether demonstrated through poetry, rap or other rhythmic artistry, the english language includes a major part in the use of metaphorical use, personification and other forms of figurative language. The continued use of figurative language adds deeper meaning to the writing in sonnets and other form of poetry and this is continuously demonstrated throughout Shakespeare’s work. As love is the central theme of most of Shakespeare’s sonnets, his writing exudes many tones, including passion, disgust, anger and hope. Seemingly similar in writing form and word use, Sonnet 130 and Sonnet 30 differ in themes, tone and situation. To begin with, Sonnet 130 demonstrates the relationship the speaker has with his wife and his dislike for her throughout the piece. Although he believes his love for her is uncomparable, he continuously uses metaphorical language that compare her breath to that of something that reeks, and …show more content…
The overall theme of love is displayed in resentment and flawed character in Sonnet 130 while Sonnet 30 discusses the passion and persistence that leads to eventual love. The tones also allude to the theme of love but clearly differ in the unpleasant message derived throughout Sonnet 130 while Sonnet 30 directs the reader to passion, desire and persistence. Finally, the situation in each sonet are similar in the fact that they both involve the speakers feeling towards woman , but differ through the image the speaker depicts of the woman being described. Sonnet 130 and Sonnet 30 remain the most passionate and figurative poems written by shakespeare and through his depiction of the surrounding and subjects, his old english narratives define the image of real and raw

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