The Themes Of Landscapes In William Wordsworth's Poetry

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Landscapes in William Wordsworth's poetry As for William Wordsworth, the splendor of nature was everything, straight from childhood. This can be traced even as a toddler where he was brought up in a house on the bank of a stunning but a mighty river, nature penetrated his daily life in a region of stupendous natural beauty along the Lake District of the Northern England (Hartman 87). In like manner its beauty, however, William was very conscious of the terrible power of nature, and this is evident in most of his portraits of dark, ominous mountains and the seclusion of desolate moors. The uses of this kind of contrasts enable him to reflect on the inscrutability of both life and death as humanity. Indeed, he has made most of his audiences’ …show more content…
His poems extol nature as a single domain that relics free from the current social corruption and impunity. The use of landscape shows logic that hierarchy in the world and moral structure is present in the natural environment. In most of his poems, Wordsworth expresses this belief. Take a read at this poem, I Wandered Lonely as Cloud and observe how Wordsworth has depicted different ways in which nature has offered a source of inspiration (Sergeant 78). Starting from the cloud wandering to field daffodils, he portrays the images that depict the influential nature of nature. In his poem the Solitary Reaper, he invokes the image of a lady who is joined at the hip with her natural setting depicting her as impalpable and as pure. In Wordsworth’s poems, the subject matter of nature is backdrop which has consent to the humanity look into nature of art, truth and existence. Concurrently, his poems include imagery and moods which facilitate to promote the glory of nature. In the Solitary Reaper, natural scenery is what makes the poem of the knight and his fall from elegance to happen. From the analysis of most of the works, Wordsworth comes out as a romantic poet whose love for nature is a crucial element (Sergeant 78). For instance, in poems like The Solitary Reaper, contain romantic themes of bewilderment and thoughts which are brought about by respect and love of natural environment which makes such kind of elements possible. In his Daffodils, one can see the idea of individuality is brought out by making reference to nature. In Daffodils, nature in conjunction with the natural world is imperative in conveying the emotional sensibility and get hold of an individual sense of self (Sergeant 97). Additionally, in Wordsworth’s Upon Westminster Bridge, the use of nature is manifested in the opening lines and throughout the body of the poem. He illustrates that there exists a natural aesthetic evident if

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