The Theme Of Loneliness In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Register to read the introduction… "All men hate the wretched; how then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet you my created detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bond by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us." The monster explained to Frankenstein that he has no friends and was lonely and his quest in life was companionship and understanding. He said, "It is my loneliness that made me savage." Frankenstein heard his voice and it scared him; he saw his reflection and it frightened him. After being able to understand most of the French language, he realizes that he is not normal. "When I looked around, I saw and heard none like me. Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and all men disowned?" He no idea where he came from or how he came into existence. These unanswered questions made the monster increasingly lonelier. Desperately lonely, the monster decides to seek out the friendship of the cottagers. De Lacey is kind to him but before he can reveal who he is to him, Felix, Agatha and Safie come in the door and Felix attacks him. The monster gets so desperate for companionship that he kidnaps and young boy hoping to teach him to love but instead ends up killing him. After all this, he monster tells his request to Frankenstein, "I am alone and miserable. Man will not associate with me; but one as horrible and deformed as myself would not deny herself to me. My companion must be of the same species and the same defects. This being you must create." Frankenstein fails to complete this task, and the monster can no longer handle the loneliness that he feels and in the end of the book, he runs off to kill himself, never to be seen or heard from

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