The Theme Of Isolation In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Mary Shelley’s gothic novel Frankenstein portrays the theme of isolation and all its negative effects on the characters. The creature is most affected by alienation from society and a lack of community. No one throughout the creatures life shows him complete acceptance. The creature’s disfigurement further divides him from those around him and inhibits his desire to join society. The creature’s feelings of solitude and abandonment by Victor provide it with a vengeful goal and reason to live. Isolation can also be felt through Shelley 's use of surroundings and atmosphere for the characters including dungeons,secret laboratories, and the Arctic. Ultimately, the monsters rejection from society have a negative effect on the creature and the …show more content…
“Isolated physical settings--prisons, dungeons, monastic cloisters, remote castles, secret laboratories--have of course played a frequent role in creating the 'atmosphere ' of numerous Gothic novels” (Schmid 2). Frankenstein was just one of the many gothic novels that put great emphasis on the setting to portray some of the authors themes. Shelley seeks to further strengthen her theme of isolation by ending her novel in the desolate Arctic. Robert Walton writes a letter to his sister telling of his experience in the Arctic. “How slowly the time passes here, encompassed am I by frost and snow” (Shelley 15). Robert is feeling isolation from society on his voyage. Shelly also describes the ever changing weather to echo her theme. She uses words like “ bleak” and “decay” to describe the changing weather patterns. These all tie in to her overall feel of darkness and …show more content…
Everyone, including his creator Victor, could not overlook the drastic differences in the creature 's appearance. Being a solitary being with no one to relate to also had a large impact on the creatures inability to live a peaceful life. Victor remains responsible for his demise because he abandoned the creature and would not accept it therefore creating the desire for revenge in the creature. The entire novel featured a strong theme of isolation strengthened by Shelley 's use of setting and atmosphere. The creature had no possible chance of surviving in Victors society, instead was forced to put all its efforts into seeking revenge on

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