The Theme Of Isolation In Into The Wild By Jon Krakauer

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Chris McCandless, was at peace in the end. He found everything that he was searching for by the surroundings in nature and pure isolation. Into The Wild by Jon Krakauer demonstrates that isolation is something that will help achieve inner peace, serenity and experience a raw exhilaration of human emotions that can only be found in the core of isolation. Krakauer placed many stories or fellow adventurers whose stories ran parallel to McCandless’s, in which they demonstrate how isolation helps discover this newfound emotion. Profound novelists in which McCandless admired, wrote a lot about the interests of one’s solo journey and the prospects of reaching fulfillment. After McCandless had pass, all he has left behind were notes that tell a profound …show more content…
Other opportunists share the same experiences as Chris McCandless, as they too are trying to isolate themselves in order to achieve solitude and live off the land completely. John Waterman’s expedition was featured in Into The Wild, as it was an adventure that ran parallel to McCandless’s. As they both had parent complications, close relations with their sibling, and both of them went on a prolonged extemporaneous road trip. John embarked on a 145 day expedition on a solo ascent of Mt. Hunter’s southeast spur in the Alaska Range. Waterman did not find what he was looking for on this adventure as “instead of putting his demons to rest, success had merely agitated them” (78 Krakauer). This solidarity of his hike did make John aware of his demons that he would not have been able to find in civilization as it took great extremes and a near death experience to even provoke these demons. Krakauer is a fellow adventurer who didn 't fail to mention his expedition next to McCandless’s. His adventure to Climb the Devils Thumb, which is on the border of Alaska. Jon has the determination to climb the North side …show more content…
These idolized novelists came to the conclusion that isolation reveals fulfillment and total freedom that religious leaders abide by in order to experience a raw exhilaration of human emotions that can only be found in the core of solitude. McCandless envied many authors in which he underlined key passages that he felt he had a personal connection towards. Anthony Storr is a psychiatrist and novelist who had a very similar life as McCandless, in his novel, Solitude; A return to the Self, exemplifies how “the potentially creative person toward developing aspects of his personality which can find fulfillment in comparative isolation” (61). It clearly demonstrates that solitude ranks alongside relationships in its impact on an individual 's well being and productivity, as well as on society 's progress and health to be enriched by spending time alone. This “solitude and total freedom of the wilderness create[s] a perfect setting for either melancholy or exultation” (157), for mankind to discover. Roderick Nash author of Wilderness and the American Mind, is trying to achieve that nothing comes close towards the exultation that came be found alone and in touch with nature. Another American novelist in whom McCandless idolizes for his compelling nature towards isolation was Paul Shepard. His novel Man in the Landscape: A Historic View of the Esthetics of Nature explains that the

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