The Theme Of Fear In Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

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For countless people, fear has a major impact on people’s actions, decisions, and lives. In Daniel Defoe's adventurous novel Robinson Crusoe, the theme of fear of the human condition is relevant as shown through the narrator's vigorous journey. Daniel Defoe was an English author from the late 1600s to early 1700s, and he published the novel, Robinson Crusoe, incorporating themes such as fear about the human condition. The theme is prevalent through the protagonist, Robinson Crusoe and he is stranded on an island, left with no help, Crusoe is forced to face the fear of the unknown and unexpected events that take place on the island. While on the island, there are several occurrences where fear is seen in Crusoe and how it affects him as a person. …show more content…
Defoe’s writing style and content was easily affected by how he was raised and taught and “Defoe's realistic style was heavily influenced by his childhood” (Moss 6). As a young man, Defoe was raised Presbyterian with strict, religious parents. Before becoming a successful author, Defoe served as a journalist. As seen in his writing, the heavy teaches of religion at his younger ages impacted his storytelling, and God is reflected upon several times as Crusoe turns to him for answers(Moss). His prior knowledge of religion influenced his decision to heavily incorporate religion in the novel. With religion, Defoe was also inspired by the story of Alexander Selkirk, a sailor who marooned on an island for years. Using this story, Defoe added his own taste and crafted Robinson Crusoe. Along with the story of Alexander, “we know, from the sale catalogue of his library, that Defoe himself was an avid reader of travel accounts” (Richetti 52). As the setting of the novel takes place on a foreign island, it's easy to see that Defoe researched heavily before he started writing. Unfortunately, Defoe passed in 1731. Religion, past events, and research gave Defoe the formula to write the adventurous and eventually successful novel, Robinson Crusoe …show more content…
Crusoe, being the adventurous type, seeked to go beyond the boundaries of the typical life of a middle class men in England (Robinson). As a young adult, the idea strikes Crusoe, that idea being going out to sea. Little did he know that when he set foot on the boat, his long, vigorous journey would begin their (Defoe). At sea, Crusoe’s ship is demolished by a great storm, and crusoe plummets into the hellish waves, “Nothing can describe the confusion of thought which I felt when I sunk into the water; for though I saw very well, yet I could not deliver myself from the waves so as to draw a breath…” (Defoe 48). After battling the brutal waves, Crusoe washes on the shore of a deserted island, forced to face fear and survive on his own. Living in england for most of his life, Crusoe arriving on the uncivilized island is a new and fearful experience. At first, Crusoe struggles to maintain civilization on the mysterious island, and is left to face the unknown and too survive

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