The Theme Of Dystopia In Claire U. Rivera's Virtual Center

Improved Essays
As a tyrannical government is allowed to rule freely over the illiterate masses, technology became so advance in a way wherein work that should be done by people are being replaced by robots, virtual centers are being safe havens for the people who choose to refuse to live but rather exist in something that isn’t real and tangible. Raissa Claire U. Rivera’s “Virtual Center” is a unique but horrifying example of a society built in Class Division which showcased the poor versus the rich, and the miscreants versus the government. It was set in a Philippine futuristic dystopian setting where everyone can live in a virtual world, and how the indigent people work for the opulent resulting to an unending cycle of poverty and class oppression destructive …show more content…
This short piece features Delia who is the central character in this story. She is being described as a young, underprivileged, and submissive to the system of the government. She narrows her options because of the lack of education and economic constraints. Her job is to attend the bodies of the majority of the people who have chosen to live in a virtual life. She is a part of the working class who earns just enough salary to meet both ends but not enough to provide luxurious things even for her …show more content…
Rivera’s “Virtual Center” is a great addition to your reading list. It was a fresh experience to read a well-written Filipino sci-fi story with a twist. It will bring you to a roller-coaster ride of emotion as you put yourself into Delia’s shoes and see how technology and government can change anything with a snap of their fingers. It showed the readers that each one should not be afraid to voice out your opinions in regards to the anomalies and inhumane systems of the government. If no one will stand up against them, nothing will happen to our society, the cycle of poverty will just keep on repeating and the poor will always be at the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Even though the world Huxley describes appears to be perfect on the surface where everyone is happy, a closer analysis reveals this society is much more like a house of cards, waiting to collapse on itself. By stripping every aspect of the individual away, the Brave New World consolidates its citizens into one thoughtless mob. This novel truly gives readers a glimpse into the dangers of absolute power. If it were more widely studied and discussed, I know the majority of the population would see the clear and present threat we face today and it would serve as a constant reminder to ensure individual freedoms are never extinguished and the type of environment depicted in a Brave New World should never be allowed to take place. Lastly, Brave New World is a satirical look into the possible future of the world as we know it.…

    • 1311 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many low-wage workers cannot afford to not get paid for a whole day, so they usually go to work regardless of how sick or injured they might be. The observations that Ehrenreich observed during her experiment are facts that low-wage workers experience…

    • 762 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    A social circle is more than the amount of money one possess it includes the impression one leaves to other individuals in that group. As Lily hits an all time low tries her hand at hat trimming. In the elite group people see her as experienced but once placed with other women in the working class she finds herself knowing “she was an object of criticism and amusement to the other work-women. ” This specifically reveals how separated each class was and to find a place within one required skill and knowledge. Lily only is equip for the elite life which did not help her in the working class.…

    • 1476 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The unequal pay for women in every occupation is a fundamental part of everyday life which restrict individuals to support themselves and their families. It is fine for the women who would agree to work for less and would stop…

    • 1589 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Economic Inequality Essay

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Usually whatever class you are born into is the class you will remain in. not all cases are like that and some people end up in poverty because they enter the foster care system or dependent on the government. Some people can also make it out of the lower class, but it’s very rare and easier to fall into poverty then get out. There is a big industry that circulates…

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Fortunately for myself and my co-workers, Mr. R2 I think your number of probability is wrong. Automation and the whole idea of robots being able to do deal a game of blackjack is thrilling and exciting, but take heed they will not overhaul the industry. Robot dealers is a fad whose buzz will fizzle out like the 80’s mullet hairstyle. Mechanization, computerization, robotics is more practical industries where profit grows with rapid and efficient flow. However, in the blackjack industry where the backbone of the business is pure customer service, robots will only play a small role.…

    • 1431 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    1984 Marxist Analysis

    • 1656 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Outer Party individuals are living in houses that are extremely old and rotting away yet the government expects them to live there. The exploitation here occurs because most of the people either Inner or Outer Parties do not realize that they are being exploited. Yet they do realize that there do not get enough money to buy “victory coffee” let alone try fixing their houses or paying for something more than food. These individuals do not feel alienation which Marx states that occurs in these situations because they are forced to spend time together and it is also socialized that spending…

    • 1656 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Wall-E Dystopian Film

    • 569 Words
    • 3 Pages

    They developed a culture and society that was mechanistic and artificial, as opposed to organic and natural. Wall-E contends that what makes us fully human is cultivating our own deepest nature by working, and working together. Humanity renews the face of the Earth through its own labor, by people taking responsibility for themselves instead of being passive consumers coddled by the corporate welfare state. Unlike the usual idea of science fiction, the machines in Wall-E don't turn on man, but liberate man from enslavement to machines. Ironically, then, this Pixar movie is a creative but full-frontal attack on modernity.…

    • 569 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jastrow says “Computer intelligence is growing by leaps and bounds, with no natural limit in sight (Jastrow 1594).” This leaves no boundaries for the expansion of technology. Jastrow also says “ultra- intelligent machines will be working in partnership our best minds on all the serious problems of the day (Jastrow 1594).” This partnership may require a high amount of intelligence on both ends. Which would require robots and computers to become almost human like. Having a partnership with humans would require robots to be able to function without human help. Scientists used to fear the thought of artificial intelligence, but now they use it in their everyday lives (Levy 1598).…

    • 1627 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Her experiences show that low wage workers can barely scrape up enough money for food and housing, let alone children or education. This is a large part of why the lower class cannot get out of the whole they’re…

    • 950 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays